Goal 2: No Hunger

End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture

The University of Wollongong is committed to working towards the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through its governance, teaching and learning, community engagement, partnerships and research. The following initiatives are by UOW staff and students working towards SDG 2: No Hunger.


Teaching, learning and outreach

1008

Students studying subjects about this goal (2020)




100

Media stories about this goal in 2020




506K

Media stories reached an audience of 506K on social media in 2020

 

Research

70.3%

Publications with international collaboration

 

69.2%

of the international collaboration publications are with developing countries

 

8.9

Citations per publication (global average 3.7)

35.1%

Publications in the top 10% of journals (8.1% in the top 1%)

2.9%

National contribution to SDG2

 

 

 

    

Food+ With Care Initiative

UOW staff from across the institution have offered time and financial support to collaborate with community organisations and charities to distribute hot meals, frozen meals, groceries, toiletries and sanitary items in “Panty Packs” to student based in both Wollongong and Sydney. To date over 4000 students have received this support, with donations from staff and community in excess of $55,000.

SDG operations icon 62px   SDG icon Community    SDG icon divider    UN SDG 1 No Poverty    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger



Healthy Cities Illawarra

UOW’s partnership with Healthy Cities Illawarra, aims to address the underlying social, economic and environmental causes of health inequity. Healthy Cities Illawarra is a local organisation working to create healthy environments and enable healthy choices for the people of the Illawarra and Shoalhaven. Together, we are committed to taking action to prevent and control diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, asthma, dementia, depression and anxiety.


SDG icon Community    research icon only 62px small   SDG icon divider    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 3 Good health and wellbeing    UN SDG 10 Reducing Inequalities



Hidden Harvest Wollongong

Hidden Harvest is a volunteer-fuelled, not for profit organisation based in the Illawarra region upskilling communities to tackle food waste and serve up a more sustainable future. Hidden Harvest has partnered with Sofie Kokalevski, the business development lead for the work-integrated learning subject Career-Ready Learning and Practice to provide numerous UOW students with a variety of meaningful internship opportunities. Hidden Harvest was the winner of the ACEN 2020 Local Hero Award. The Local Hero Award is awarded to a partner organisation that is a small-medium enterprise whose engagement with a university in WIL and whose contribution to the WIL experience of students, is above and beyond the expectation of the size of their organisation.


teaching icon only 62px     SDG icon Community    SDG icon divider    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 4 Quality Education



UOW Foodways

Foodways is a group of UOW researchers investigating what, how, and why we eat. The group strives to understand the intersection of food, environment and society, from local through to global perspectives, through aligning with the UN SDGs to promote inclusion and connection through food. Foodways brings novel and diverse approaches to complex issues around food, including community and key stakeholders’ perspectives to provide a new lens to disrupt and reform current food systems policies and processes. Foodways’ aim is to increase food autonomy, food system sustainability, and overall health and well-being.


SDG icon Community    research icon only 62px small    SDG icon divider     UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 3 Good health and wellbeing



Most vegan-friendly university in Australia

UOW is committed to providing a broad range of food options and was named Australia’s most vegan-friendly university in 2017, by the international group People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).


SDG operations icon 62px    SDG icon divider    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 15 Life on land



UOW Pulse

UOW Pulse is a not-for-profit organisation where revenue generated is re-invested to support campus life and the student experience. This year, UOW Pulse put together free meal packs to provide much-needed food supplies to our student community during the COVID-19 pandemic, with 1400 meal packs distributed in April. UOW Pulse also offers free breakfast to students. To date, 3600 pantry packs have been donated by staff to students across Wollongong and Sydney. The total donations amount to approximately $75,000.

SDG operations icon 62px   SDG icon Community    SDG icon divider    UN SDG 1 No Poverty    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger



Regenerative agriculture research

Regenerative agriculture is an environmentally sustainable way of farming that takes a holistic approach to land management. It emphasises improving soil quality naturally, increasing biodiversity, and enhancing soil carbon sequestration and soil water retention. This study looks at the social and emotional journey of farmers.


SDG icon Community    research icon only 62px small    SDG icon divider    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger   



Strengthening local food systems governance

This multi-university project aims to investigate the role of law, policy, and regulation in enabling local governments and communities to contribute to healthy, sustainable, and equitable food systems. Using an interdisciplinary approach, researchers have analysed policies and initiatives developed by local governments and communities in New South Wales and Victoria ​that aim to contribute to a healthy, sustainable and equitable food system. The knowledge created by this project will inform recommendations for policy and legislative reforms that will empower local governments and communities to respond to food system challenges at the local level. This project is based on a food systems approach, which reflects a growing awareness of the interconnections between food production and consumption, environmental sustainability, and health outcomes, and the need for governance approaches that addresses these interactions.


research icon only 62px small  SDG icon divider   UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 3 Good health and wellbeing     UN SDG 11 Sustainable cities and communities    UN SDG 12 Responsible consumption and production   UN SDG 16 Peace, justice and strong institutions

Food cultivation

The Sunraysia Burundian Garden arose via a collaboration between UOW researcher Natascha Klocker, University of Melbourne, refugees from Burundi (living in Mildura) and Sunraysia Local Food Future. Many refugees come from agricultural backgrounds, but face obstacles to farming once in Australia. This research shows that many former refugees living in Australia have a desire to access land on which to grow culturally important crops, but can’t afford to do so due to the cost of farmland. Refugees also struggle to access employment and thus experience protracted unemployment. This research partnership aims to determine how we can come together to match ‘landless’ refugee farmers with unused farmland.


SDG icon Community    research icon only 62px small    SDG icon divider    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 8 Decent work and economic growth    UN SDG 10 Reducing Inequalities



Community-based management of coastal fisheries

This project investigates sustainable community-based management of coastal fisheries with over 100 local communities in Kiribati, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. Outreach involves community awareness presentations, facilitation of development of community-based fisheries management plans, and training for community monitors to track catch in select sites with the goal to support adaptive management by communities.


SDG icon Community    research icon only 62px small    SDG icon divider    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 15 Life on land




Sustainable food systems and fisheries

UOW is home to the globally recognised Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources & Security (ANCORS), which is dedicated to delivering specialised research, advisory services, education and training in ocean law and policy, maritime security, and marine resources management. ANCORS’ world class multidisciplinary research includes investigating fish in sustainable food systems and fisheries economics management. As fisheries supply over 15 per cent of the animal protein consumed by 4.2 billion people globally and thus are an integral component in reducing hunger and ensuring sustainable fishing practices and capacity building.


teaching icon only 62px    SDG icon Community    research icon only 62px small    SDG icon divider    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 14 Life below water



Fish, food and security

This research supports the development of an integrated approach to address under-nutrition in children and over-nutrition (obesity) in adults by positioning food security as the central drive for sustainably managing coastal fisheries in the Pacific islands.


SDG icon Community    research icon only 62px small    SDG icon divider    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 14 Life below water

 

 

Maximising yield through open source programming

Researchers from UOW’s Centre for Bioinformatics and Biometrics are working on cutting edge, free statistical software for rapid throughput, high quality grain research. Mathematical models are used by plant breeders around the world to select which crop varieties should be planted to maximise yield in the face of climate change and diseases. The new system, called mfxlm, stands for the Mixed Effects Linear Models used to model the experimental results. Mfxlm is a free, open source software package, designed to be run on everything from laptops to on-demand cloud processing to supercomputers, supporting researchers here and in the developing world to move towards computationally efficient and reliable selection of the best crop varieties to grow.


research icon only 62px small    SDG icon divider    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 15 Life on land



 

Statistical tools to reduce hunger

Feeding the world and reducing poverty rely on increased agricultural productivity and sustainable food production. Publicly and privately funded plant breeders are continuously striving to produce new varieties with improved yields, resistance to constantly mutating diseases and resilience to our changing climate.

Statisticians from the University of Wollongong’s Centre for Bioinformatics and Biometrics  collaborate with a network of Australian researchers and crop breeders to identify international crop genetic material (germplasm) that performs well in Australian environments whilst maintaining disease resistance and genetic diversity. This collaboration between Biometrics for the Australian Grains Industry (BBAGI) and University of Sydney-led CIMMYT-Australian-ICARDA Germplasm Evaluation (CAIGE) enables researchers from across the world access to the latest statistical technology with a view to improving variety selection decisions and ultimately global food security.


research icon only 62px small   SDG icon divider    UN SDG 2 Zero Hunger    UN SDG 13 Climate Action    UN SDG 15 Life on land

 

 

Subjects and courses for SDG 2

Subject description

This subject provides an introduction to the topic areas of cell biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, genetics, microbiology and immunology. During this subject you will look closely at the links between structure and function in cells and important biological molecules whilst investigating cellular division and mechanisms to control the cell cycle and prevent cancer. You will hear about techniques in genetic engineering and break throughs in biotechnology. You will learn about different microorganisms and their role in human, animal and/or plant health and explore the physiology of the immune system. Through engagement in group research projects you will develop skills in effective research and communication, teamwork, self-reflection and peer assessment whilst developing your digital literacy skills in presenting your research through PowerPoint (or similar tools) and generation of an electronic Portfolio. Find out more.

This subject is working towards:

All 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. 

Faculty

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health

Degrees

General Schedule of electives, Bachelor of Bionanotechnology (Honours), Bachelor of Bionanotechnology (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Conservation Biology (Honours), Bachelor of Conservation Biology (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Exercise Science, Bachelor of Exercise Science and Rehabilitation, Bachelor of Marine Science, Bachelor of Marine Science (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Medical and Health Sciences, Bachelor of Medical and Health Sciences (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Medical Biotechnology (Honours), Bachelor of Medical Biotechnology (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Medicinal Chemistry (Honours), Bachelor of Medicinal Chemistry (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Nutrition Sciene, Bachelor of Pre-Medicine, Science and Health, Bachelor of Science

Subject description

This subject examines fundamental principles of human movement, considers nutritional demands and exercise responses to encourage a healthy lifestyle and highlights common issues and chronic conditions that can compromise health throughout the lifespan. Find out more.

This subject is working towards: 

Goal 2: Zero Hunger    Goal 3: Good Health and Wellbeing

Faculty

Faculty of the Science, Medicine and Health

Degrees

Bachelor of Medical Biotechnology (Honours), Bachelor of Medical Biotechnology (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Exercise Science, Bachelor of Exercise Science and Rehabilitation, Bachelor of Medical and Health Sciences, Bachelor of Medical and Health Sciences (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Nutrition Science, Bachelor of Science.

Subject description

Health Promotion is the process of enabling people to take control of and improve their health through behaviour change. This subject introduces students to the concept of health promotion, including existing theories and models, and demonstrates how these can be applied in particular settings (e.g. health services, work sites, schools and communities). Health promotion programs that target dietary change (ie. nutrition promotion) require measurement of dietary intake, for both planning and evaluation thereof. This subject examines the various methods used to measure dietary intake in populations and healthy individuals, as well as how to assess these measurements against national and international standards, for the purpose of developing appropriate health promotion strategies. Topics covered include validity and reliability of different dietary assessment methods and the use of different food composition databases for nutrient analyses, as well as the analysis of body composition and estimation of energy requirements, and interpretation of national survey data for monitoring and surveillance of the nutritional status of populations. Find out more.

This subject is working towards:

Goal 2: Zero Hunger    Goal 3: Good Health and Wellbeing    Goal 4: Quality Education

Faculty

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health

Degrees

Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours), Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics (Honours) (Dean's Scholar), Bachelor of Nutrition Science

Subject description

This subject covers the key areas of community and public health nutrition, including food and nutrition monitoring and surveillance, food and nutrition systems; food and nutrition policy; program planning, development and evaluation; and principles of nutrition promotion. Issues related to advocacy for policies and programs to address public health nutrition priorities will be introduce. Current issues in Public Health Nutrition in Australia and elsewhere will be reviewed. Find out more.

This subject is working towards:

Goal 2: Zero Hunger   Goal 3: Good Health and Wellbeing   Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities.   

Goal 12: Responsible consumption and production

 

Faculty

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health

Degrees

Graduate Certificiate in Nutrition, Master of Nutrition and Dietetics

Subject description

This capstone subject will provide students with an opportunity to consolidate their knowledge, skills and attributes required for safe, competent practice as beginning registered nurses. Students will explore global issues in healthcare and how they can impact local change as registered nurses. Students will propose and complete a capstone learning project through which they demonstrate their abilities to integrate, analyse, synthesise and apply knowledge and skills relevant to their professional interests. The project will focus on a relevant scholarly, professional or practice issue \that impacts their local community utilising the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals as a framework. Students will complete a critical reflection of the work undertaken during their degree that includes their state of readiness to undertake the role of a registered nurse within the workplace and how they may impact local and global challenges within this role. Find out more.

This subject is working towards:

All 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

 

Faculty

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health

Degrees

Bachelor of Nursing, Bachelor of Nursing (Conversion)

Latest news for SDG 2

Women with reef fish for sale at Gizo market, by the ocean, Western Province, Solomon Islands. Photo by Filip Milovac, WorldFish
Climate change threat to ‘tuna dependent’ Pacific Islands economies
Four men are silhouetted against the ocean in Vanuatu. Photo: Paul Jones