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Systemic Entrapment

This project seeks to deconstruct, undermine, while also understand the association with the multiple interactions and multigenerational experiences, across governmental systems that maintain First Nations Peoples oppression.

This project seeks to deconstruct, undermine, while also understand the association with the multiple interactions and multigenerational experiences, across governmental systems that maintain First Nations Peoples oppression.

The term ‘systemic entrapment’, describes the ways in which First Nations Peoples experience ongoing colonisation and continue to be controlled and contained under various laws and legislative regimes.

Systemic entrapment links pathways of contact with multiple governmental institutions such as education, employment, child protection, health, juvenile justice and the criminal justice system. This is in addition to deconstructing experiences of racial profiling to better understand the ways in which poverty is and can be criminalised. This work will assist to advance Indigenous Research Methodologies through an emancipative and critical theory lens, considering approaches from the Western academic system blended within an Aboriginal paradigm.

Specifically, in this project we bring together current knowledge and expert advice in order to explore what is required to identify where and how systemic entrapment occurs and how it functions to continually oppress First Nations Peoples. For practical purposes, we draw on our extensive networks of practitioners working within South Eastern New South Wales which can be seen as a microcosm of Australian society.

 

The team

The project is led by two Aboriginal early career researchers, Dr Marlene Longbottom and Associate Professor Peter Malouf, supported by the senior researchers on the grant. The project brings together a strong interdisciplinary team with extensive experience within their respective disciplines including, Indigenous studies, human rights law, public health and health services, psychology, education, employment, sociology, anthropology, information systems and African American studies.

The project draws from Dr Longbottom’s national and international networks of Indigenous researchers with recognized expertise in a systemic approaches to human rights issues, including: Dr Hannah McGlade (Human rights lawyer, Curtin University); Dr Jocelyn Jones (Public health epidemiologist, University of Western Australia); Professor Ronald Stephens (African American Studies and Research Centre at Purdue University, United States).

This project is working towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals:

Goal 10 Reduced inequalities      Goal 17, Partnerships for the Goals.

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