Internships

Internship programs offer you ways to gain academic credit whilst gaining valuable work experience in your chosen field. We know it is an important stepping stone in your transition from education to employment.

This subject provides academic credit to accompany the work placement (internship) which is on occasion organised by students with the permission of the Discipline Leader PAIS, in conjunction with the Head of Students for the School. 

For full subject information, see the subject database.

This subject will enable Politics students to undertake internships in relevant political offices in the Illawarra or Sydney. Students undertaking this subject will be attached to the office of an elected politician, or work within a part of government bureaucracy. They will undertake duties as directed by their supervisor in that institution. Enrolment is conditional of approval being granted by Discipline Leader, PAIS.

For full subject information, see the subject database.

Admission to the Australian National Internship Program (ANIP) is highly competitive and by application to the ANU. If selected students will undertake two months or more full-time work in as a parliamentary intern based in the offices of Members of Parliament and Senators and engaging with a range of activities that shape national policy-making. Placements in the Public Service or other agencies are also possible. UOW will credit the completed ANIP with 12 credit points. Enrolment in POL346 is conditional on being selected for the ANIP.

For full subject information, see the subject database.

There are 4 (four) research internship available through the Australian Centre for Culture, Environment, Society and Space, School of Geography and Sustainable Communities in Spring session 2021 as part of GEOG292 and GEOG352.

To register your interest please email Dr Jenny Atchison jenny_atchison@uow.edu.au to obtain an expression of interest (EOI) form and return this to Jenny by 5pm, 19 July 2021. Please do not email project supervisors directly.

Successful students will be notified at the commencement of Spring session and will receive instructions about enrolling in the relevant subject and next steps. 

Project 1: Salvation Army Spatial Mapping Internship

Position: Policy, Research and Social Justice Department, Research Assistant

Supervisors: Dr Eliza de Vet (TSA) and Dr Chris Brennan-Horley (ACCESS) 

The Salvation Army (TSA) is an international charitable Christian organisation that provides social and community services to those in need. TSA offers a wide range of services designed to provide holistic support to those experiencing disadvantage, including those impacted by drugs and alcohol, family domestic violence, homelessness, modern slavery, unemployment, financial hardship and disasters. 

TSA’s Policy, Research and Social Justice Team (PRSJ) plays an important role in understanding and advocating for Australians as well as measuring the impact services have on communities. This information informs best practice, policy and advocacy. 

The Team would like to engage an intern to illustrate TSA’s national footprint with geographical mapping tools. During the internship, the successful candidate would be introduced to the structure and function of TSA PRSJ team, and would mainly interact with the Research/Policy Team in the project. 

Content for 80-hour placement agreement

Description of roles and tasks:

  1. TSA data cleaning and formatting in excel
  2. Locating and extracting ABS data on disadvantage (either SEIFA data or ABS demographic data that captures known vulnerability characteristics).
  3. Produce national and state maps that show/point-towards unmet need
  4. Optional extension work: produce additional maps of interest (e.g. distribution of COVID-19 impacted clients)
  5. Present findings in a chosen output format (e.g. a written report, story map, presentation). 

Planned timetable for 80 hours

  1. Initial meeting and project discussion between student and the TSA team (2 hours)
  2. Data cleaning and formatting (9 hours) and meeting (1 hour)
  3. Locating and extracting ABS data on disadvantage (4 hours) and meeting (1 hour)
  4. Produce national and state maps (50 hours) and meetings (3 hours)
  5. Prepare and present findings (10 hours)

The project can be completed entirely via Microsoft Teams. However, the intern would be encouraged to meet the TSA supervisor on campus and come into the Redfern office to meet the Sydney Team (COVID-19 restrictions permitting).


Project 2: Community-led weed management in south-east NSW

Position: Australian Centre For Culture, Environment, Society and Space (ACCESS) Research Assistant

Supervisor: Dr Sonia Graham (ACCESS) 

Weeds are a major threat to the sustainability of rural ecosystems and industries. They have multiple vectors and easily spread across property and jurisdictional boundaries. This suggests that collective solutions should be more effective than individual weed management efforts. Yet we have little information about what community-led weed management groups are doing and how they encourage others to participate in their collaborative weed management initiatives. 

This internship position involves systematically collecting and analysing publicly available documents, such as newspaper articles and meeting minutes, to understand how 12 community-led weed management groups operate in south-east NSW. Activities will involve: identifying and collating newspaper articles and meeting minutes for up to 12 community weed management groups; analysing the documents to identify what collaborative activities each group participates in; identifying how groups encourage others to participate in weed management. 

There will be an opportunity to learn how to use NVivo qualitative analysis software to facilitate the analysis and comparison of documents. The internship will be supervised by Dr Sonia Graham and expressions of interest are now being sought. The internship will suit a second-year or third-year student. The internship is offered in a flexible mode for 80 hours, between July 26 and October 29. The work can all be done online, and will involve about five virtual or face-to-face project meetings. 

Content for 80-hour placement agreement 

Desired outcome

The preliminary analysis undertaken by the intern will form part of a research project being undertaken at the University of Wollongong. The broader project is titled ‘Catalysing collective action for effective weed management’ and is exploring how social relationships enable collective weed management in south-east Australia. 

Description of roles and tasks 

  1. Search for and download newspaper articles using the Proquest database.
  2. Search for meeting minutes for each group using Google.
  3. If necessary, undertake training in how to upload documents into NVivo and undertake word frequency searches and thematic analysis.
  4. After consultation, use NVivo to analyse the newspaper articles
  5. Write a report that summarises the metaphors used in the newspaper articles. Maximum word count: 5000 words. 

Planned timetable for 80 hours 

  1. Initial meeting between student and organisation supervisor (1 hour)
  2. Follow up meeting to review documents identified and collated (8 hours)
  3. Training session on NVivo if needed (3 hours)
  4. Preliminary coding of 10 newspaper articles (10 hours) and meeting (1 hour)
  5. Coding of remaining documents (60 hours) and meeting (1 hour)
  6. Report writing (15 hours) and presentation of results meeting (1 hour)  

Project 3: Media analysis of post-fire weed management discourse

Position: Australian Centre For Culture, Environment, Society and Space (ACCESS) Research Assistant

Supervisor: Dr Sonia Graham (ACCESS) 

The 2019-2020 bushfires had a dramatic impact on the communities, animals and plants of south-east NSW. This has been compounded by the above average rainfall during 2020, which means that many weeds species have emerged in abundance. 

Over the last 10 months, UOW researchers have completed a series of interviews with land managers across the SE NSW region to understand the impacts of the bushfires on their weed management practices. The land managers have reported that they find the response of weeds to be both soothing and overwhelming. 

This internship position involves a media analysis to understand how experiences of weeds post-fire are being discussed in the public domain, i.e. in newspapers. Activities will involve: identifying and collating newspaper articles from 2020 onwards; identifying key themes present in the newspaper articles; and reporting on the findings. 

There will be an opportunity to learn how to use NVivo qualitative analysis software to facilitate the analysis and comparison of newspaper articles. The internship will be supervised by Dr Sonia Graham and expressions of interest are now being sought. The internship will suit a third-year student. The internship is offered in a flexible mode for 80 hours, between July 26 and October 29. The work can all be done online, and will involve about five in-person project meetings. 

Content for 80-hour placement agreement 

Desired outcome

The preliminary analysis undertaken by the intern will form part of a Global Challenges research project being undertaken at the University of Wollongong. The broader project is titled ‘Collective weed management in post-fire landscapes: learning from successes and failures’ and is exploring how to create a meaningful and impactful weed management resource (a virtual “Hub”) to transform individual and community responses to weeds after fire. See more information about the broader project and UOW team. 

Description of roles and tasks 

  1. Search for and download newspaper articles from SE NSW using the Proquest database.
  2. If necessary, undertake training in how to upload documents into NVivo and undertake word frequency searches and thematic analysis.
  3. After consultation, use NVivo to analyse the newspaper articles
  4. Write a report that summarises the metaphors used in the newspaper articles. Maximum word count: 5000 words. 

Planned timetable for 80 hours 

  • Initial meeting between student and organisation supervisor (1 hour)
  • Follow up meeting to review documents identified and collated (8 hours)
  • Training session on NVivo if needed (3 hours)
  • Preliminary coding of 10 newspaper articles (10 hours) and meeting (1 hour)
  • Coding of remaining documents (60 hours) and meeting (1 hour)
  • Report writing (15 hours) and presentation of results meeting (1 hour)  

Project 4: Mt Keira historical sites – compiling historical information and sources

Position: Australian Centre For Culture, Environment, Society and Space (ACCESS) Research Assistant

Supervisor: Associate Professor Nicholas Gill (ACCESS)

Mt Keira forms a significant part of the backdrop to the University of Wollongong. Since European settlement it has been used and occupied for a variety of purposes – mining, farming, timber getting, transport etc. The legacy of this history is a variety of tangible and less tangible sites and artefacts on and around Mt Keira and Mt Pleasant. These include constructions, infrastructure, and artefacts relating to mining, farm and building sites, names, roads and routes, and water infrastructure and fencing. 

There has been considerable historical research conducted on Mt Keira, including by Wollongong local history organisations and likely by profession historians and others as well. This information is likely held by these organisations in their collections and probably also in documents and other sources in the local studies collection at the Wollongong City Council library. This internship will collate and make accessible existing resources and information for identified Mt Keira sites for SGSC teaching, engagement, and research. 

Content for 80-hour placement agreement 

Desired outcome

A report documenting key information, sources, and source location for identified and located (using latitude and longitude) historical sites on Mt Keira. 

Description of roles and tasks 

  1. In conjunction with the supervisor, identify and locate potential sites, including by site visits on Mt Keira/Mt Pleasant.
  2. Liaise with local historical organisations to identify sources and information relating to sites on Mt Keira/Mt Pleasant – eg. Illawarra Historical Society, Balgownie Primary School Museum, Illawarra branch of the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy
  3. Liaise with staff and examine the resources of the local studies collection at WCC library to identify sources and information relating to Mt Keira/Mt Pleasant.
  4. Record sources, source location, key informants and contact details, key information relating to sites, further sites of interest, and write a report containing this information.
  5. Where possible, obtain copies of sources and information. 

Planned timetable for 80 hours

  1. Initial meeting between student and organisation supervisor (1 hour)
  2. Site visits on Mt Keira/Mt Pleasant – by walking (5 hours)
  3. Contacting and liaising with local organisations (10 hours) meeting with supervisor (1 hour).
  4. Visiting and liaising with local museums, WCC Local Studies Collection, and relevant organisations (10 hours) and supervisor meeting (1 hour)
  5. Reading and noting sources (40 hours) and supervisor meeting (1 hour)
  6. Report writing (10 hours) and presentation of results meeting with supervisor (1 hour)

Project 5: Urban interventions and dementia literature review

Position: Australian Centre For Culture, Environment, Society and Space (ACCESS) Research Assistant

Supervisors: Dr Chris Brennan-Horley (ACCESS) and Associate Professor Lyn Phillipson (HAS)

People living with dementia in the community face barriers to moving around their neighbourhoods as pedestrians. Multiple factors such as poor signage, inadequate walking infrastructure, decreased recall and spatial memory can make travel beyond the home or residential care setting problematic. These issues can become compounded as their condition worsens, contributing to a shrinking activity space with flow-on impacts to wellbeing. To date, little research has looked into what small and simple changes could be made to support movement and wayfinding for people living with dementia. Yet there exists a parallel literature about urban interventions (including guerrilla urbanism and public art interventions) that place-based dementia research could benefit from.

The intern will conduct a literature review and supporting annotated bibliography on the theme of urban interventions. The review will contribute to ongoing dementia friendly communities research and advocacy at UOW as well as strengthening international collaboration with dementia researchers based at Sterling University, UK.

This internship will be supervised by Dr Chris Brennan-Horley (ACCESS) and Associate Professor Lyn Phillipson (HAS). The internship will suit a third-year student who has completed GEOG241 Just and Sustainable Cities. The internship is offered in a flexible mode for 80 hours, between July 26 and October 29. The work can all be done online, and will involve about four project meetings which will be conducted via Zoom. The student will need to provide their own laptop.

Content for 80-hour placement agreement

Desired outcome

An annotated bibliography and literature review report on the theme of urban interventions: namely tactical/guerrilla urbanism, disability interventions and arts-based strategies.

Description of roles and tasks

  1. After initial supervisory meeting, search relevant databases, gather, read and note sources
  2. After consultation with supervisors, compile annotated bibliography
  3. With support from supervisors write literature review. max word count 5000 words
  4. Present findings

Planned timetable for 80 hours

  1. Initial meeting between student and supervisors (1 hour)
  2. Searching relevant databases, reading and noting relevant sources (20 hrs)
  3. Compiling annotated bibliography (25 hrs)
  4. Writing literature review document (30 hrs)
  5. 3x 1 hr progress meetings  (3hrs)
  6. Presentation of final literature review to supervisors and international collaborators (1 hour)

If you are a hard-working, high performing student committed to progressing to a career in the field of creative arts there may be an opportunity for you in the Creative Arts Internship Program.

Successful students will spend a minimum of 60 hours in an organisation, working on an agreed project with exposure to a fully operational professional environment.

Applicants must be mature, engaging, articulate and willing to serve as ambassadors for the University. You should aspire to benefit from the experience professionally, culturally and personally.

Students are eligible to undertake a placement with an organisation provided they meet the following criteria:

  • current and enrolled student at the University;
  • approval is obtained from the Faculty/Department; and
  • the Faculty/Department confirms that the Placement is related to the student’s studies.

Expression of Interest

Expressions of interest should be made to Teo Treloar in the first instance.

Students who wish to apply for this subject are required to organise their own internship. This will involve contacting local businesses and liaising with them regarding your start date, hours of availability and what you hope to achieve from the internship. Once the internship has been organised students will need to complete the documentation listed below and send it to TAEM administration.

Resources

To complete your enrolment, successful applicants are required to:

Enquiries

Please contact Teo Treloar for further information or advice - treloar@uow.edu.au

Students enrolled in this subject should contact the Subject Coordinator to discuss internship options. View the subject description for detailed information and session availability.

Documentation

Applications must be submitted a minimum of five (5) workings days prior to the commencement of your placement. Failure to do so may delay and/or invalidate your placement plans.

Prior to commencing placement, students must complete and submit the following:

The Internship Evaluation Form is to be completed by your supervisor at the placement organisation.