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Knowledge Series Banner - Tim Flannery

Knowledge Series

The UOW Knowledge Series showcases University of Wollongong thought leaders in various locations, discussing a range of engaging topics.

A message from the Vice-Chancellor

Professor Paul Wellings CBE thanks our alumni for your ongoing support and launches our Knowledge Series Special Edition.

WATCH VIDEO

Remote learning ready: UOW's response to COVID-19

Professor Theo Farrell in conversation with Monique Harper-Richardson

00:05
We're here today with professor. Theo 'Farrell deputy vice chancellor for education at the University of Wollongong,
00:10
Professor Farrell has a wide portfolio, but mostly responsible for digital and online learning.
00:17
So, to our first question, what a journey for you from head of war studies at King's College, London through to Dean of Arts and social sciences at the University of London then here to Wollongong in law humanities and the Arts
00:30
and now deputy vice chancellor. I wondered when I was preparing for this discussion with your search area, which is in war studies, actually prepared for the task that you
00:40
had to take on most recently university in how we took our teaching remotely During covid.
00:46
Oh, correct. Question one. So I indeed, I was in London for over a decade as a professor of war studies at King's College London,
00:55
and in my research is on strategy and the conduct of contemporary war. So I guess in three ways, it you know, it is kind of relevant, has kind of helped in three ways.
01:06
I mean, the first is that the military are famously very good at planning. I mean, they do a lot of planning and we've been doing a lot of planning in this process.
01:14
I mean, we've been sort of neck deep in plans basically to get us through get us through this crisis and take taking the whole university into remote delivery.
01:23
And the interesting thing about it is that this sort of second point is the military are also very good at crises. You throw them into a crises and they're in their element.
01:32
And one of the reasons why they're in their element is because they do a lot of planning. So military plans almost invariably never survive.
01:38
Contact with the enemy is the expression they've plans or never what how things actually turn out. But it's because you do a lot of planning that you actually can figure
01:46
a way through a crisis. And we found ourselves thrust into this crisis very quickly, like many universities. And I'm very proud to say that, you know, I just have a fantastic
01:54
team around me and colleagues across the university just on a really terrific job, actually, in navigation our way through this crisis. I guess the last point I don't make is
02:04
the military of this idea of what in their military plans of what they called main effort. And that is you identify the one thing that you really want to focus your attention on,
02:13
because by focusing attention on this, you will achieve what you're trying to achieve any more. That would be victory quite early on.
02:21
The vice chancellor came out with a very strong statement, which was really a statement around main effort, where he said to the entire university community,
02:29
our focus is going to be on getting ourselves online for remote delivery and getting ready for our students so that we can give them the best possible experience.
02:39
That was that was the main effort of the entire institution. And I think that rallying call that the vice chancellor put out to everyone was very important and very powerful.
02:47
Face to face teaching for the University of Wollongong is a strength. Some might say our core strength started to move so quickly.
02:54
Planning crises call to action. But what did it really take for us to move and be so logistically quick to have that focus to move to remote delivery?
03:04
Yeah, indeed. I mean, so I think one of the things that Wollongong is very proud of is the quality of the student experience, the quality of the education we provide.
03:12
And, you know, consistently year after year, we do so well in those quality indicators, learning and teaching in the top universities in Australia.
03:21
So it's very important for us, you know, that when we went to remote delivery, we went online. But that was the best that we could possibly provide for our students.
03:30
I think there are two key things there that really, really took for us. One was staff engagement and mean we had to get staff to engage with online delivery.
03:39
And so that was a real challenge for us, which was because everybody had to do it. Every single teaching staff member had to actually get their heads around teaching
03:48
online, and they did. That was really important. So we we stopped classes for two week periods while we just trained up everyone.
03:57
And we had seventeen hundred staff participate in that two week period in training, which is incredible. And we we created your day online teaching course,
04:08
learning and teaching course for staff on all aspects of learning and teaching. And that's been running now since since late March. And we've had one hundred and fifty thousand visits to that site by staff coming of that state
04:20
, the training modules and use the resources everybody has engaged. And that's been a really amazing effort. And the other thing is, is the student experience.
04:29
I mean, we've been really, really focused on the student experience. And midway through the last semester, we did a survey of our students find out how we're doing
04:37
basically. And the results just, I thought were incredible. You know, all aspects of our learning and teaching, the quality of our pre-recorded lectures, the quality of the Real-Time
04:47
classes, quality of the online materials that we have on our Web sites, the staff, student directions, the student satisfaction ratings were between seventy seven and
04:56
eighty five percent, average of 82 percent satisfaction. That's incredible. What we actually think that tells us is that. What students were were telling us was I think many
05:06
of them had a really good learning experience, but I think for the most part what they were saying is we can see that you're really tried hard and they really appreciated that.
05:14
So I think that spirit of the staff really leaning in engaging and students likewise, you know, leaning in and engaging and realising that we're doing all that we can.
05:23
I mean, that's been incredible. I mean, it really has been a member of staff. The head of one school said this is the UOW spirit in action.
05:30
And I think it really was
05:31
I think you write about the spirit. It comes at many ways in terms of the university. There are many courses that have a practical component. So if we think for some students, that practical component actually takes place off campus, which includes
05:45
nursing education. And then for some of our students, it's actually labs and other types of practical. So if we think about students in science and engineering,
05:53
how did you focus around how those practicals would continue or be managed during this period?
05:59
Yeah, of course. I mean, that's that's obviously very challenging area, because some aspects learning, teaching actually aren't that difficult to put online.
06:06
But some areas like laboratory work or some of the practical works or workshops where invariably, you know, the physicality of what you're doing is actually this is core
06:15
to it that's more challenging to do online. And, you know, you gave examples of nursing education, great examples because both of those schools have had really
06:23
innovative leadership. You've got Tracy Maroney Professor, Tracy Maroney, who's who's head of nursing, and Professor Sue Bennett, head of education of both World-Class educators who do a lot of stuff that's online actually so happens.
06:37
And in both those schools, they've actually been doing a lot of stuff online. And in nursing, for instance, they've they they've done some quite experimental stuff through
06:46
online delivery of classes that are actually quite practical. And also, I have to say, in science and engineering, actually, they they move to a lot of a lot of work online.
06:55
So, you know, member staff went into the laboratory and did laboratory work, which they were streaming out to students. So in the spring semester, we are we are on track
07:08
to return about 15 percent of our subjects back on campus. And we're focussing on those priority subjects where really students will benefit by being on campus, which is labs
07:17
And the practise very positive because many of our alumni, we have very large numbers of graduates in nursing and education.
07:23
One of the scientists and engineers and they will be thinking about the current students who are our future alumni and how they what their experience be different
07:31
will have the practical skills. So I really appreciate you taking the time to elaborate on that particular challenge.
07:37
Do you think students are more likely to want to continue with the remote delivery and to full face to face or perhaps a blend moving forward?
07:47
What would you project going forward that students might be looking for for their education?
07:52
Yeah, I mean, obviously it will vary from student to student. Every student just has their own circumstances. I mean, broadly speaking, post graduate students tend to be
08:01
more favourably disposed towards online learning. And many of them have, you know, a mix of work applications and family obligations. And so the flexibility that online
08:11
offers really, really generally postgraduate students find that very advantageous. Whereas generally undergraduate students for the most part tend to be more disposed towards on campus teaching.
08:25
And that's because, of course, they not always, but they tend to be straight from school. They tend to be younger people.
08:31
And the university experience offers not just obviously the education, but the very rich social experience, the opportunity to build networks that last you your whole life,
08:40
the opportunity to build social capital and the skills to build social capital. And so that college campus experience is very important for that reason. But broadly speaking,
08:50
I mean, online does offer flexibility. And so I think there's considerable scope for us to do more on campus, to mix online with our own campus provisions. This kind of hybrid
09:02
you're talking about and what I would describe as blended learning and so know in many subjects, say, for instance, you might replace one as one part, the subject say, for instance, some lectures with online material,
09:13
and that offers flexibility, which even undergraduates appreciate, because undergraduates, once they do want the campus experience for the most part, many of them, they also value flexibility
09:24
because many of them work actually or many have. Many do have care applications.
09:28
And so I think, broadly speaking, we will see a lot more online going forward. But at the same time, we are all eagerly awaiting the return to vibrant campus life.
09:40
Theo what role do you see alumni playing in the future of education?
09:46
Very important role, actually. So we've been talking about online or remote delivery. That's where all the attention is these days. Just for now. But at the same time,
09:55
if you look at the government's agenda and they're very focused on jobs creation jobs and rightly so. I mean, just this week, you know, the treasurer was giving his effectually
10:04
many. Budget. And and the unemployment projections at the end the year are looking very serious. So anywhere between about nine point five to over 10 percent
10:13
unemployed. So the government is very focused on on creating job opportunities. And it's going to be challenging, actually. Add to Productivity Commission today, put out a report. It's really interesting. They looked at the what happened with employment after
10:29
the 2007 2008 global financial crisis. And what you had for the decade after that. Was that for young people, it became much more difficult for them to get the kind of jobs that they would expect to get.
10:42
So unemployment itself didn't really wasn't too bad beyond 2010, but actually job opportunities for young people as the kind of jobs they should have got given their their education status. That became a real issue.
10:55
And this is what what's referred to as scarring in the economy, long term effects of downturns. And we're facing the possibility of scarring. So in addition to online, the other area that are really focused on this is how do we better prepare students for
11:10
the future of work, given that we know what's going to change Industry 4.0? And how do we develop a portfolio of lifelong learning offerings? And there are alumni, a very important role to play because I think we have to reach out to our whole community
11:22
and involve them in the effort in co designing future lifelong learning offerings and also bringing bringing alumni in to support mentoring opportunities with our students and and potentially also into the classroom.
11:35
And I know and I know from my experience back in London, where we did quite a lot of this, is it happens that very often people really appreciate the opportunity to come back into university where they graduated and give something back
11:46
and have an opportunity maybe to mentor or to teach us small to give up a small amount of time to do that. And both students and alumni really benefit from that interaction. So I'd like to see what we can do in that space.
11:59
Exciting times ahead. And what comparisons do you see between learning institutions across the globe? What's interesting about covid 19 is that all institutions faced
12:10
the same challenges at the same time. What are your observations? Being able to see it? Not really. Just as one countries issue, but a global issue?
12:18
Yeah, it is very interesting. Covid 19 has been the great leveller. I mean, across all of humanity has been impacted and it's been a global shared global experience, albeit with with with local and regional differences.
12:32
And so in the education space, basically universities across the world have had to have had to close down their campuses. And they've done it at different rates. And that's the big, big difference, actually, is the rate at which they've closed down
12:44
campuses and broadly speaking, in the West. Universities have been able to close campuses really quite quickly, actually, because we had the resources to go online very quickly and our students had the resources to access online learning.
12:57
But in other countries in the global south, the race has been more mixed. And that's partly down to resources being able to deliver online regulation.
13:06
The regulatory bodies. So in some some countries online learning that the registry bodies have been less favourable towards online and having to change their view.
13:14
And also, of course, what's been quite important is that the country's experience of off the health crisis has been different. So the you know, broadly speaking,
13:24
the northern countries got hit earlier. I've coming out, coming out of China, but then spreading into Europe and North America. Those countries got hit faster and earlier
13:36
than that than the global south, which got him in his bed later. So that would have obviously impacted him when when campuses closed.
13:42
But broadly speaking, ever and ever, every university roughly ends up in the same place, which is going online,
13:47
certainly a once in a century experience across the globe. So what have you been doing personally to manage your stress during this time,
13:57
particularly around covid, but also turning a very large tanker from face to face to online teaching in a short period of time?
14:04
Yeah, I mean, of course. I mean, I have to say this. The what we've managed to achieve by moving in moved ninety nine point nine percent of our subjects online.
14:13
So that was incredible. It was just a huge a huge collective effort and also in terms of all of our student support. So that's the support provided by our Pro-Vice chancellor
14:24
students. Our provide jobs to students are a students accommodation services division, are information management technology services.
14:31
It's just been a massive collective effort. As one of my senior colleagues says, this is very much a team sport. And so it's part of that shared endeavour.
14:39
So that really helps with stress because you're all in it together and you're all pulling in the same direction. And so I think sharing those experiences with your colleagues has been has been very important.
14:49
And the other is I've taken up Scotland. So it's a game of Scrabble every evening. Listening to classical music is a great way to end the day and invariably losing to my wife. But that's OK.
15:00
It's a great de-stressor and it's very wise to keep raising. And then in closing, our final question, what leadership? Listen to me personally, take it away from this experience that you'll take forward.
15:11
Yeah, that's a nice question to end on. So first is, I think, around setting a clear direction. And that goes back to my point about structure diversity
15:20
, that you want to empower your colleagues and and the whole institution. You want to harness the energy, but you have to set a clear direction and where you're going. And I think that's what the vice chancellor did with his rallying call to say this is now
15:32
the single focus of the institution. So I think that's that's a really important lesson. I think also another lesson I would take is about believing in people.
15:41
I mean, it we we manage to make a success of this because our staff on our students all pull together. And I mean, for me, I know you, UOW has a terrific spirit.
15:52
Obviously, I've known that since since I've arrived. But I just didn't appreciate the depth of of that. And so it's it's seen that in action. And it's not just UOW of course,
16:02
many of the universities, we've seen similar things. And speaking to our fellow deputy vice chancellors and we will all get together and think of you swap war stories.
16:10
But I mean, others have likewise and other universities have said it's you know, see, it's been very challenging, the whole covid 19 crisis.
16:18
But it's been incredible time to be to be working in university has been a great privilege to see how the whole university communities and all the universities around Australia
16:27
have pulled together to get to get ourselves through this crisis and support our students. So for me, that's that's an important lesson.
16:34
What a delightful area to finish with. Professor Theo Farrell gave up his time so generously today to have a conversation with us.
16:45
We look forward to an update in the future once students come back to campus.
 

 

How people respond to law and governance in a crisis

Associate Professor Cassandra Sharp in conversation with Sarah Vickery

00:05
well we're here today with dr cassandra sharp
00:08
who is an associate professor at uow's school of law
00:12
her research relates to understanding the motivations expectations and
00:16
values of individuals as they respond to law in key crisis moments
00:20
a very pertinent topic as we continue to navigate our way through the COVID-19
00:24
pandemic which has thrown the world into a state
00:28
of heightened panic disease and anxiety welcome cassandra
00:32
well i think it's safe to say that 2020 has been a year like no other
00:36
and we've all had to adapt to changing circumstances
00:40
and new laws that have quickly introduced to be strictly enforced
00:44
so generally speaking how do you think the public have responded to the
00:48
restrictions that were introduced during the crisis well i think apart
00:52
from the hiccups that we had at the beginning with the toilet paper
00:54
stockpiling and the grocery hoarding i think australians have adapted
00:59
reasonably well as much as we can i think that given the uncertainty
01:05
around the the virus spreading quickly around the globe
01:08
and also around community transmission in those early days
01:12
we've did we've done the best we can to adapt as quickly as possible
01:16
i think wherever there is a kind of a trust
01:20
in our governments and our law makers that
01:23
their actions are appropriate and working we feel like we can
01:27
relinquish some of our freedoms in those moments so wherever we have that trust
01:32
and confidence we feel that we can give up a few of our
01:35
freedoms but i think that when we start to doubt
01:40
the imposition of restrictions then we might be a bit more reluctant
01:45
if we if we don't see that this is a huge
01:48
public health risk to ourselves and our loved ones
01:52
then we might be a bit more reluctant to have our rights diminished
01:56
absolutely certainly been a big time of adapting to change and i guess we're all
02:01
just doing the best we can in these times that's right
02:03
so what do you think about the way breaches of restrictions such as say
02:07
sitting down in a public place or lying on a beach which i know in the early
02:11
days was commonly moved on by police how do you
02:14
think that was handled by law enforcement agencies
02:17
i think at the start there were concerns that there was a potential for police
02:22
to to be heavy-handed in the issuing of fines
02:25
particularly in those areas which might seem to us
02:28
quite frivolous in the early days but i think that's
02:32
always going to be the downside of discretionary power when there are new
02:36
directions or regulations that are put into place that
02:39
impact upon our everyday activities we want to have this awareness and
02:45
assurance that there's going to be consistency
02:48
in application um of those those restrictions and
02:52
and a guidance on how we're to behave i can give you a
02:55
a personal example of that actually we were as a family during lockdown out on
03:00
a bike ride and we had gone for about an hour and
03:04
then we stopped in a park to have our snacks and we were quite a
03:08
distance away from anyone else just enjoying that time together as a family
03:12
when a police officer doing the rounds came over and encouraged us to move on
03:17
with our snacks and sort of said you know you probably should be moving on
03:21
and it was he was quite lovely it was all
03:23
fine there wasn't any angst and he certainly didn't mention fines or
03:27
penalties but we had a conversation about how
03:30
it's a really awkward sort of moment for the police officers in that regard and i
03:34
think the swiftness of the way that these
03:38
restrictions came into being they had a really
03:41
difficult job and so i think that in the end
03:46
we have to recognize that they had to adjust uh
03:50
quickly to those changes and i think now they've kind of moved on there's a shift
03:53
in focus potentially to those blatant disregard for the rules
03:58
where um you know people are having large house parties or 200 people and so
04:02
on so i think there's been a bit of a shift in focus
04:04
what is the usual process for introducing
04:07
temporary changes to law so in australia to change any law or to introduce a law
04:12
it needs to go through a parliamentary process so this is whether it's state or
04:16
federal that process is usually involves a lot
04:20
of discussion and debate and consultation and a lot of time
04:26
spent discussing the the impact of the new changes or the new law
04:31
and uh and how it will actually come into being and so
04:34
it's a time-consuming process from parliamentary
04:37
um discussion to approval to royal assent that can sometimes take
04:42
weeks months or even years in some cases with the COVID situation the
04:49
changes to laws at both the federal and state level
04:52
came into being within 24 hours to that point of being enforceable
04:56
so i think we can see how quickly things can move in a national emergency but it
05:00
usually is a time consuming process wow that certainly is fast in the scheme
05:04
of things isn't it and um is it unusual for the enhanced
05:08
police powers to be introduced so rapidly i mean
05:11
you did touch on the fact that you know it was a 24-hour process but
05:14
is this an unusual circumstance would you say yes it is
05:17
relatively unusual and that's because these
05:21
kinds of amendments to the law usually take a lot of time it's a rigorous
05:24
debate process that's what the process the parliamentary process is designed to
05:29
do it's its whole purpose and so it is relatively unusual to be
05:33
that fast the last time that rapid changes or
05:37
introduction to law has occurred with respect to police power was back in
05:42
2014 with the government's 16 point plan with respect to combating
05:49
alcohol violence so you might remember the one punch laws
05:52
that came into being which allowed police officers to
05:57
conduct drug and alcohol testing on suspected offenders
06:01
and those amendments were brought in within a week from parliamentary process
06:06
to enforceability and so at the time those laws those amendments were seen to
06:12
be a knee-jerk response to public demand but yes generally speaking um it isn't
06:19
usual for these types of um amendments to be so fast do you think
06:23
that there was adequate publicity and about the constantly changing state
06:27
of the laws during the pandemic you know i think there was criticism uh
06:31
in the early days too about you know potentially conflicting
06:34
messages and people weren't sure about what it is they can and they can't do in
06:38
their everyday lives particularly when out and about um but
06:42
you know we live in an age that's at the technology age where the
06:45
opportunities to communicate and disseminate information
06:49
is limitless almost and so i think they've done the state government and
06:54
the federal government and department authorities have done a
06:58
very concerted effort to bring
07:02
those uh changes and information to the awareness of the public
07:06
i mean if you think about it each of those departments have websites
07:10
uh that they're constantly updating there have been media releases there's
07:14
been briefings there's been press statements there's been campaigns
07:18
across all the major news networks and television and radio
07:22
advertisements and social media hashtags have been
07:26
deployed to help with that communication like um
07:29
hashtag ospol and hashtag coronavirus australia
07:33
i was going to say i think if you didn't know about what was going on in the
07:36
world right now you would have been you know virtually living under a rock so it
07:40
was certainly all consuming when it first came about
07:44
wasn't it um and then you mentioned social media
07:46
hashtags what role did social media play in helping
07:50
communicate the changing laws do you think well so as i mentioned
07:53
not only did the governments and the department the health department and all
07:56
those authorities have websites that they communicated their
08:00
changing impacts on but they also have a very strong social media presence
08:06
most of those departments have a facebook page and also
08:10
either instagram twitter or even some of them have youtube
08:14
channels it's so accessible and i think that's the key
08:18
to communicating key changes or information
08:22
in a rapidly changing environment it is so accessible i mean most people
08:27
have any of those platforms on their phones in the palm of their hand
08:33
almost daily you know all the time every day
08:36
and so we have this opportunity to disseminate information
08:40
to a wide range of people thousands and thousands of people
08:43
very quickly it is an environment where if you think about
08:49
it the social distancing requirements
08:54
and the isolation of this pandemic actually stimulated dependence on social
09:01
media for information so isolation when we really get down to
09:05
it fuels our dependence on digital technology to provide the
09:10
information that we're so desperately seeking in
09:13
those moments and i think that that individuals really rely on all of those
09:18
different platforms to get that information
09:20
because we're we're really um struggling to deal with life in those
09:26
times and that is a way that we can bring comfort to ourselves and awareness
09:29
in those moments absolutely it really makes you wonder
09:32
how it would have been without social media isn't it when you cast your mind
09:35
back what more than 20 years or two even less
09:38
15 years ago that's right you wouldn't have had
09:40
this uh mechanism to disseminate such information that's right we're living in
09:44
a wonderful age very powerful yes so how does social media commentary
09:49
actually challenge or transform understanding of the law
09:52
in times of crisis so with the proliferation of social media use with
09:56
so many people using social media and if
09:59
you think about it facebook has a 2.5 million
10:04
users instagram and twitter has uh between them 1.5 million users
10:09
with that proliferation of so many people using social media it is a key
10:13
way to not only disseminate information
10:17
but to transform ideas about how we are responding
10:21
to the various activities that are being impacted by
10:26
government restrictions and government action and so
10:29
um the the nature of social media is actually to amplify and intensify
10:37
the urgency with which we will respond in these situations and it acts as this
10:42
kind of conduit to facilitating the way in which
10:46
we express ourselves in in these moments my research certainly
10:50
shows that in the times of a crisis or
10:54
these significant events individuals do take to social media to share with
10:59
others their concerns or their critique or
11:02
their their um their responses and reactions to to
11:06
various uh activities of our governing authorities
11:10
if you take for example the mask at the moment it's a hot topic
11:14
people are trying to decide is the ma is wearing a mask
11:18
a moral right is it a legal obligation should the law
11:21
mandate the use of a mask this kind of debate is being critiqued
11:25
and discussed on a rolling basis on social media and and
11:30
it allows for that to be um facilitated amongst a wide range of
11:36
people and so what lessons do you think the
11:38
governments can take away from the way people have responded to the virus shut
11:42
down and the way information was shared on
11:44
social media about the restrictions so i think the link between crisis and
11:50
threat and government policy has been a real
11:55
topic in the literature over the previous years and and i think that the
11:58
research does indicate that we or individuals in society do
12:04
believe that we live in a dangerous place and that it's the role of our
12:08
governments and the law to protect its citizens and to keep them
12:12
safe it's really crucial that our policymakers and our
12:16
governments understand the way that individuals and
12:20
communities will respond to their actions to their
12:25
decision-making in that in that kind of crisis or event or
12:29
moment and i think one of the things that it would
12:32
be important for governing authorities to recognize is
12:35
that social media provides this unprecedented access
12:39
to our community's views on the way in which they're operating and the
12:44
the work that they're doing and how that impacts upon our daily lives
12:48
so the impact of law on an individual and a community
12:52
can be interpreted by looking at social media comments
12:56
it's it's the it's the place where you can go and see
13:00
publicly what people are thinking and feeling and responding in that way
13:04
it's like an immediate survey of public without having to actually do a survey
13:08
in a sense yeah and if there is if there is panic
13:11
and confusion and uncertainty and distrust that's
13:14
percolating in the public consciousness then it's a real opportunity for the
13:18
government and authorities to kind of calm fears and to take action quickly
13:24
absolutely well i just have one more question for you cassandra
13:28
the world as we know it has changed forever and it's likely we'll be
13:32
managing restrictions for some time yet how could authorities work with the
13:37
public to achieve more widespread compliance
13:40
and best case scenario outcomes i think particularly as the pandemic has
13:44
progressed people are becoming mentally saturated
13:48
overwhelmed and potentially confused about where do
13:51
we stand now with various restrictions i think clear and decisive and
13:57
calm communication was really important i think that crisis like these provide
14:03
the paradoxical potential to either unite or to divide
14:09
australians and i think that tapping into that
14:13
from the government perspective is really important the way
14:16
in which they access and use social media
14:19
will be key to facilitating one of those particular polarizing
14:24
responses the prime minister several years ago in
14:28
relation to security in 2017 said that
14:33
the public wants their lawmakers and their government to put the safety
14:39
of their people first and to know that they're doing
14:42
that and i think this is this is really important legitimacy is
14:46
crucial for engendering trust in the australian
14:50
public and so i think that it's a really
14:53
important aspect for our governments to take on
14:57
board to take note of where people are at with their decision
15:02
making and to respond and to tailor their
15:05
response for that and i think one thing i've noticed
15:10
lately is that people are becoming more numb
15:12
to instruction and to statistics and i noticed that with the advertising
15:18
from our governing authorities in recent days
15:22
that there's been a bit of a shift a shift in gears from
15:25
from say the mind to the heart so there was an advertisement that ran
15:29
where instead of actually touting instruction it was
15:33
a family a mum and a dad talking about their daughter who was working on the
15:37
front line during this pandemic and so it's
15:39
speaking through story to that idea that we need to take care
15:43
of one another and we do it not just for ourselves but for others
15:46
and so that's potentially a way to tap into
15:49
speaking to the community where they're at
15:53
social media is as it engages the whole being
15:56
the whole human person and so i think it's good for governments to do that too
16:02
fantastic well cassandra that's been so insightful thank you so much for
16:05
speaking with me today and we look forward to hearing more
16:08
about this fascinating area as social media continues to take shape into the
16:16
future

 

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