Undergraduate Courses

Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics

Testamur Title of Degree:

Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics

Abbreviation:

BPPE

UOW Course Code:

1870

CRICOS Code:

N/A

Total Credit Points:

144

Duration:

3 years full-time or part-time equivalent

Home Faculty:

Faculty of Law, Humanities and the Arts

Intake Session(s):

Autumn/Spring*

Delivery Mode:

On-campus (Face-to-face)

Delivery Campus / UAC Code:

Wollongong / 753115

Additional Information:

Course Finder

*Students eligible for credit transfer may begin in Summer Session if appropriate subjects are available.

Overview

The Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics (BPPE) is specifically designed to provide high level training and skills necessary for a successful career in the public service or politics.

A cross-disciplinary degree, the BPPE affords students an appreciation of the political, ethical and economic perspectives needed to make a difference in contemporary society. In particular, students will be enabled to interpret and apply complex economic ideas and data, understand the basis behind political organisations and policy making processes, and develop a broader philosophical lens for understanding popular movements, systems of government, and ethical forms of behaviour.

Students will develop a broad knowledge base across all three areas by studying core and elective subjects and will deepen their knowledge in at least one of these areas through a major field of study. A capstone subject allows students to bring the key concepts from all three disciplines together into a coherent whole and to simulate real world scenarios.

Entry Requirements

Academic requirements and English requirements are available from the Course Finder.

Course Learning Outcomes

Students graduating from the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics will be able to:

  1. Identify and evaluate key methods and concepts in the academic disciplines of Politics, Philosophy and Economics
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the relationships between the disciplines of Politics, Philosophy and Economics and the points at which their key methods and concepts diverge
  3. Apply the theories of each discipline to analysis of practical questions and problems
  4. Communicate ideas and arguments related to Politics, Philosophy and Economics with diverse audiences and communities
  5. Understand, interpret and apply qualitative and quantitative social science research methods in the investigation of political, philosophical and economics issues

 

Course Structure

To qualify for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics a student must complete a total of at least 144 credit points from subjects listed in the Course Structure for the degree and other subjects as approved by the Faculty as outlined in the table below.

Students must complete: Credit Points
The program of study for the 3 PPE components of Politics, Philosophy and Economics (outlined below) 84
Subjects to complete at least one of the three majors in this degree: Politics, Philosophy or Economics (outlined below) 24
COMM121 Statistics for Business 6
PPE 300 Politics, Philosophy and Economics Applied Research Project 12
Additional credit points of electives from the general schedule to bring the total number of credit points completed to 144. 18
Total 144

Politics

The discipline of Politics is an exciting, vibrant and constantly changing body of ideas, approaches and methods. The Politics program offers subjects in international relations, Australian politics, political theory, comparative politics, the politics of developing countries, public policy, culture and media. Students are advised to study as broadly as possible across the areas offered by the discipline.

The purpose of the major is to acquaint students with key areas of Politics as a discipline. Political study involves examining the origins and nature of consent, authority, and consensus, which underpin social order. Many factors are covered in this examination; political institutions, political economy, culture, class, gender and ethnicity. Politics can and does occur at many levels, from international relations to the nation state, from local communities to the individual. The study of politics is not just to do with politics in the here and now, but concerns itself with both the past and the future. Whether it is a country being studied, relations between countries, or a body of political ideas, politics engages us with choices about how to live life and how best to contribute to society.

Program of Study for PPE

The program of study for Politics will consist of 30 credit points in subjects from the following table.

Subject Code subject Name Credit Points Session(s)
PPE Core
POL 150 Government, Power and Political Systems 6 Autumn
Plus 24 credit points from the following 200- or 300-level subjects:
200-level Subjects
POL 213 Key Concepts and Thinkers in Political Theory 8 Autumn
POL 222 Australian Public Policy 8 Not offered in 2015
300-level Subjects
POL 314 Power and the State 8 Spring
POL 319 Global Political Economy 8 Spring

Major Study

For a major study in Politics, students must complete the program of study for Politics (30 credit points) and a further 24 credit points of 200 and 300 level subjects. Subjects are to be selected from the list below, with a minimum of 16 credit points at 300 level.

Subject Code subject Name Credit Points Session(s)
Politics Electives
200-Level
POL 211 Democracy in Theory and Practice 8 Not offered in 2015
POL 216 Politics in the USA 8 Not offered in 2015
POL 224 Politics and the Media 8 Spring
POL 225 International Relations: Issues, Concepts and Theories 8 Spring
300-Level
POL 301 Politics Internship 16 Spring
POL 303 Complex Peace Operations 8 Spring
POL 317 Politics in the South Pacific 8 Autumn
POL 318 The Politics of Asian Development 8 Autumn
POL 320 Twentieth Century Dictatorships 8 Spring
POL 323 Global Inequality 8 Autumn
POL 324 Culture and Politics 8 Spring
POL 340 Special Topics in Politics 8 Autumn, Spring
POL 368 Protest and Power in America : The Sixties 8 Not offered in 2015
Students may include electives from the following subjects:
INTS121 Global Politics and Power 6 Spring
INTS202 Conflict, Peace & Security 8 Autumn
INTS201 Model United Nations 8 Autumn
INTS203 Introduction to Global Development 8 Spring
STS 300 The Environmental Context: Imagining a Zero Carbon Future 8 Autumn
STS 309 Future Tense: Politics and Regulations of Technoscience 8 Spring

Philosophy

Philosophy is the study of fundamental questions in ethics, politics, reasoning, and understanding. What are the ethical implications of global poverty and climate change? What is the impact of biotechnology on humans and the environment? How are we able to understand other people’s beliefs, motives and actions? What are the principles of good reasoning? What is the nature of scientific understanding and explanation?

By studying Philosophy students will improve their critical thinking skills and broaden their understanding of diverse points of view. They will acquire research skills and gain experience in analyzing and carefully assessing arguments and ideas on a wide range of topics.

Areas of study include ethics (both practical and theoretical), political philosophy, gender, philosophy of psychology and mind, philosophy of language and logic, and philosophy of science.

Program of Study for PPE

The program of study in Philosophy will consist of 30 credit points in subjects from the following table.  

Subject Code subject Name Credit Points Session(s)
PPE Core
PHIL107 Values, Mind and Self 6 Autumn
PHIL317 Contemporary Political Philosophy 8 Spring
Plus 16 credit points from the following 200- or 300-level subjects:
200-Level Subjects
PHIL217 Global Ethics 8 Autumn
PHIL220 Knowledge, Explanation and Understanding 8 Autumn
300-Level Subjects
PHIL309 Great Thinkers 8 Autumn
PHIL314 Understanding Minds 8 Not offered in 2015

Major Study

For a major study in Philosophy, students must complete the program of study for Philosophy (30 credit points) and an additional 24 credit points of 200 and 300 level subjects. Subjects are to be selected from the table below, and the following conditions are to be met.

Conditions:

Students electing to do a major in Philosophy must complete PHIL206 (Ethics), PHIL220 (Knowledge, Explanation and Understanding) and PHIL309 (Great Thinkers).

Students may have completed PHIL220 (Knowledge, Explanation and Understanding) and/or PHIL309 (Great Thinkers) under the program of study for PPE for Philosophy. Students who have not completed either or both of these subjects under the program of study for PPE for Philosophy will need to complete the subject(s) they have not yet undertaken as part of their major.

All students electing to do a major in Philosophy must complete PHIL206 (Ethics).

Subject Code subject Name Credit Points Session(s)
Philosophy Electives
200-Level
PHIL206 Ethics 8 Spring
PHIL207 International Studies in Philosophy 8 Autumn, Spring
PHIL213 Gender, Sex and Power 8 Autumn
PHIL241 Contemporary Phenomenology 8 Spring
PHIL255 Language and Logic 8 Not offered in 2015
PHIL256 Ethics and the Environment 6 Autumn
PHIL258 Ethics and the Environment 8 Autumn
PHIL288 Philosophy of Mind 8 Autumn
300-Level
PHIL305 Special Philosophical Questions 8 Autumn, Spring
PHIL310 Advanced Practical Ethics 8 Not offered in 2015
PHIL313 Contemporary Ethics 8 Spring
PHIL324 Digital Philosophy 8 Not offered in 2015
PHIL325 Life and Mind 8 Spring
PHIL380 Bioethics 8 Autumn

Economics

Economics provides an understanding of the operation of the economy at macro and micro levels. These include modern business, health care, the environment, the labour market, national economic policy and international monetary issues. You will learn general principles and tools which can be applied to a wide range of issues affecting the national and international economy. You will discuss the big issues including unemployment, the level of national debt, the existence of poverty and the problems confronting developing countries. You will study the three major components of Economics:

Macroeconomics, which focuses on the way the whole economy functions, examining issues such as economic growth, unemployment and interest rates.

Microeconomics, which focuses on the behaviour of individual components of the whole economy, such as consumers, companies, trade unions, employers' associations and the various levels of government.

Quantitative Methods, which focuses on quantitative and mathematical techniques and their application to business economics.

Program of Study for PPE

The program of study in Economics will consist of 24 credit points in subjects from the following table.  

Subject Code subject Name Credit Points Session(s)
PPE Core
ECON101 Macroeconomic Essentials for Business 6 Autumn, Spring
ECON111 Introductory Microeconomics 6 Autumn, Spring
ECON305 Economic Policy 6 Spring
Plus ONE of the following 200-level subjects:
ECON205 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy 6 Autumn, Spring
ECON215 Microeconomic Theory and Policy 6 Autumn

Major Study

Students electing to do a major in Economics must complete ECON205 (Macroeconomic Theory and Policy) and ECON215 (Microeconomic Theory and Policy). Students will have completed either ECON205 or ECON215 under the program of study for PPE for Economics. As a requirement of the major, they will need to complete the subject they have not yet undertaken.

Students must complete a further 24 credit points of 200- and 300-level Economics subjects as listed below.

Subject Code subject Name Credit Points Session(s)
Choose ONE of the following subjects (not already taken):
ECON205 Macroeconomic Theory and Policy 6 Autumn, Spring
ECON215 Microeconomic Theory and Policy 6 Autumn
Plus ONE of the following subjects at 200-level:
ECON222 Mathematics for Business 6 Autumn, Spring
ECON240 Financial Modelling 6 Spring
Plus ONE of the following subjects at 300-level:
ECON316 History of Economic Thought 6 Spring
ECON304 The Historical Foundations of the Modern Australian Economy 6 Autumn
Plus a further 6cp 300-level Economics subject

Dean's Scholar Degree

In January of each year, the Faculty invites applications from high achieving students to apply to transfer into the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics (Dean's Scholar) Degree.

Selection Criteria

To be eligible to apply for a place in the Bachelor of Politics, Philosophy and Economics (Dean's Scholar) Degree, applicants would normally meet the following criteria:

  • Currently enrolled in the BPPE, BA (Course Code 702) or any other degree;
  • Full-time student;
  • Have successfully completed two full sessions of study or 8 subjects;
  • Have a WAM (weighted average mark) of at least 80.
  • For more information including the full list of Dean's Scholar Degrees and how to apply online, visit the LHA Dean's Scholar website.

Credit Arrangements

Credit and articulation arrangements are available from the Course Finder. Refer to UOW's credit arrangements for information on how to apply for credit.

Other Information

Further information is available at:
UOW Course Finder
Email: lha-enquiries@uow.edu.au

Last reviewed: 16 February, 2015