Digital fatigue is real

But there are ways out of it

Back to the past: How the Taliban took over Afghanistan

The brutal end to the longest war

What is toxic positivity?

How looking only on the bright side can be damaging to mental health.

Welcome to UOW's flagship magazine, The Stand.

We bring to life subjects that illustrate the impact UOW’s teaching, research and graduates make in the world.

The Stand exists to unlock the knowledge and expertise inside the University of Wollongong (UOW), telling stories about our people and their accomplishments that inform, educate and inspire. This magazine was born out of a renewed sense of place, purpose and values that will guide the University in fulfilling its role in exploring how to resolve society’s large and complex social, environmental and economic challenges.

We believe education is one of the most powerful transformative forces on communities and individuals. It opens minds and helps people find purpose, meaning – and solutions for the world’s most pressing challenges.

This is our unified story – a story that draws on our past, understands the present, and looks to the future.

 

Articles

Energy savers

Inside homes in the Illawarra, many senior residents curl up beneath a blanket, trying to keep warm during winter.

The bush beat

When Hugh Stump was a child, the nearest hospital was at least an hour away from the family farm in north-west New South Wales. But flooding rains would turn black soil to mud and he, like so many people in the rural and remote areas, missed out on even the simplest of medical check-ups. Let alone major or critical services.

2016: The Year in Review

It was a huge year for the University of Wollongong, with 2016 heralding remarkable discoveries, technological advancements, groundbreaking new buildings, and fascinating stories from our diverse student body. UOW photojournalist Paul Jones showcases his photographic year in review.

Locked out

Is a late-night ban on entry to pubs and clubs making us safe or hurting the business and culture of Australia's largest city?

Male nurses determined to break reverse glass ceiling

Simon Lovatt, who graduated with a Bachelor of Nursing from UOW when he was 51-years-old, has joined a growing cohort of male nurses determined to break into the traditionally female dominated industry.

A man on a mission

Tim Flannery has devoted his life – and career – to championing the environment. But with climate change looming as the greatest threat to our planet, he believes the time to act is now.