Tailor your career in fintech at UOW India

Get set to make your mark with a world-class course offering

Navigating troubled waters

Why the BBNJ Agreement marks a critical turning point for ocean protection

Putting healthy snacks on the global map

Innovating accessible health food

Believing in a new age of autism support

Diagnosed with autism as an adult, Kory Sherland turned lived experience into her life's work

Welcome to The Stand Magazine

We bring to life subjects that illustrate the impact our students, teaching, research and graduates make in the world.

The Stand exists to unlock the knowledge and expertise inside the University of Wollongong (UOW), telling stories about our people and their accomplishments that inform, educate and inspire. This magazine was born out of a renewed sense of place, purpose and values that will guide the University in fulfilling its role in exploring how to resolve society’s large and complex social, environmental and economic challenges.

We believe education is one of the most powerful transformative forces on communities and individuals. It opens minds and helps people find purpose, meaning – and solutions for the world’s most pressing challenges.

This is our unified story – a story that draws on our past, understands the present, and looks to the future.

Articles

Progress with privacy

The complexity of who owns the data being recorded by this piece of technology means that without proper safeguards, governments, employers and other stakeholders such as health insurance companies, schools and law enforcement agencies, could be able to use it to determine whether a person is fit for work or needs medical or psychological intervention.

On the front line

Australia’s Black Summer was like no other, with the bushfires that raged across the nation leaving many of us overwhelmed and in disbelief at the devastation they caused. During this extraordinary time, stories of the heroes doing battle on the frontline emerged.

The changing climate of the law

Matt Ward speaks convincingly about how his profession will embrace the global shift towards creating a healthy planet. He is not a bio-scientist working on a drought-resistant wheat or an architect designing eco homes that run on sunflower oil. He is a criminal lawyer.

Finding a poetic path

It was on the shelves of the humble Forbes Public Library in western New South Wales that Sarah-Jane Burton made a discovery that would shape the course of her professional life.

Burning for a better future

In our rapidly changing climate, last summer's fires are unlikely to be a one-off event. The future health of people and the environment hinges on better understanding and managing the risks.

Healing the land to heal ourselves

When we think of bushfires, the issues of long-term drought and climate change spring to mind. But it seems the problem behind our fires runs much deeper and longer – and is now in short supply.