Digital fatigue is real

But there are ways out of it

Back to the past: How the Taliban took over Afghanistan

The brutal end to the longest war

What is toxic positivity?

How looking only on the bright side can be damaging to mental health.

Welcome to UOW's flagship magazine, The Stand.

We bring to life subjects that illustrate the impact UOW’s teaching, research and graduates make in the world.

The Stand exists to unlock the knowledge and expertise inside the University of Wollongong (UOW), telling stories about our people and their accomplishments that inform, educate and inspire. This magazine was born out of a renewed sense of place, purpose and values that will guide the University in fulfilling its role in exploring how to resolve society’s large and complex social, environmental and economic challenges.

We believe education is one of the most powerful transformative forces on communities and individuals. It opens minds and helps people find purpose, meaning – and solutions for the world’s most pressing challenges.

This is our unified story – a story that draws on our past, understands the present, and looks to the future.

 

Articles

Students sing away the COVID blues

When the coronavirus pandemic hit Australia, student Kaitlin Lawler’s final year was thrown into peril.

Creative arts graduates reach their zenith

How UOW's creative arts students are bringing their experiences to life.

10 books to read before you turn 25

As far as lists of ‘things to do’ go, this one's pretty good. Novelist, playwright and Discipline Leader of English and Creative Writing at the University of Wollongong, Dr Catherine McKinnon, shares the books she thinks every curious knowledge seeker should read before they turn 25.

Meet the music journalist making noise

Through hard work and hustle, David James Young has become one of the best young music journalists on the scene. But it has not always been easy.

How art helps children to thrive

If children aren’t given the right tools, they can lose the creative outlet that visual arts provides.

This is what grief looks like

It’s 2005, Chloe is 17 years old. She’s at home with her mum in the Western suburbs of Sydney. She’s studying at the kitchen table. It’s her final year of the HSC, so she has given the annual family ski trip a miss. It’s Sunday, her dad and two younger sisters should be driving home from the snow now. The day is growing old though and they have not yet returned.