Artificial intelligence: friend or foe? 

AI and the future of art, academia, and ethics 

5 tips for keeping yourself safe online

According to a cybersecurity expert

3 tips to avoid procrastinating

We're all guilty of it.

Welcome to UOW's flagship magazine, The Stand.

We bring to life subjects that illustrate the impact UOW’s teaching, research and graduates make in the world.

The Stand exists to unlock the knowledge and expertise inside the University of Wollongong (UOW), telling stories about our people and their accomplishments that inform, educate and inspire. This magazine was born out of a renewed sense of place, purpose and values that will guide the University in fulfilling its role in exploring how to resolve society’s large and complex social, environmental and economic challenges.

We believe education is one of the most powerful transformative forces on communities and individuals. It opens minds and helps people find purpose, meaning – and solutions for the world’s most pressing challenges.

This is our unified story – a story that draws on our past, understands the present, and looks to the future.

 

Articles

3D printing: from science fiction to science fact

Meet the UOW researchers who are using materials science and 3D printing to turn science fiction into medical fact.

Kate Swaffer

Poet, author, activist and academic, Kate Swaffer reveals how she is living beyond younger onset dementia.

Repairing us when we break. In 3D.

The statistics make for grim reading. Almost one in three deaths in Australia were caused by or related to some form of cardiovascular disease.

The bush beat

When Hugh Stump was a child, the nearest hospital was at least an hour away from the family farm in north-west New South Wales. But flooding rains would turn black soil to mud and he, like so many people in the rural and remote areas, missed out on even the simplest of medical check-ups. Let alone major or critical services.

Male nurses determined to break reverse glass ceiling

Simon Lovatt, who graduated with a Bachelor of Nursing from UOW when he was 51-years-old, has joined a growing cohort of male nurses determined to break into the traditionally female dominated industry.

No-needle diabetes

Managing complex conditions such as diabetes could be made cheaper and simpler following the development of a copper film that detects glucose from sweat or tears.