Digital fatigue is real

But there are ways out of it

Back to the past: How the Taliban took over Afghanistan

The brutal end to the longest war

What is toxic positivity?

How looking only on the bright side can be damaging to mental health.

Welcome to UOW's flagship magazine, The Stand.

We bring to life subjects that illustrate the impact UOW’s teaching, research and graduates make in the world.

The Stand exists to unlock the knowledge and expertise inside the University of Wollongong (UOW), telling stories about our people and their accomplishments that inform, educate and inspire. This magazine was born out of a renewed sense of place, purpose and values that will guide the University in fulfilling its role in exploring how to resolve society’s large and complex social, environmental and economic challenges.

We believe education is one of the most powerful transformative forces on communities and individuals. It opens minds and helps people find purpose, meaning – and solutions for the world’s most pressing challenges.

This is our unified story – a story that draws on our past, understands the present, and looks to the future.

 

Articles

Sick of seeing news about COVID-19? There’s a reason for that.

Case numbers are rising, and we are finally seeing the end of daily press conferences. Eighteen months into the pandemic, you might be suffering from news fatigue.

Meet the music journalist making noise

Through hard work and hustle, David James Young has become one of the best young music journalists on the scene. But it has not always been easy.

War and peace: the power of journalism

Ayesha Hasan grew up against the backdrop of conflict, in a small village in north-west Pakistan. Now, the journalist and PhD student is devoting her research to highlighting the importance of peace journalism.

How paywalls impact democracy

Have paywalls affected the way we access trusted news sources?

From Hanoi to Wollongong: life as an international student in Australia

Now in my final semester at the University of Wollongong, this place, and the friends I've found along the way, have been keeping me company for three years.

Worlds collided

Shawn Burns began his foray into journalism at a small newspaper on NSW's far South Coast. He worked his way around regional NSW for 16 years, finding his way into television as a reporter and chief of staff for WIN TV Wagga Wagga, before moving across to head up the Wollongong bureau.