A DIY tale

Yours & Owls

2021: The Year in Photographs

A look back at the memorable moments

Uni life: what you’ve heard vs reality

Unpacking the truth about the university experience.

Welcome to UOW's flagship magazine, The Stand.

We bring to life subjects that illustrate the impact UOW’s teaching, research and graduates make in the world.

The Stand exists to unlock the knowledge and expertise inside the University of Wollongong (UOW), telling stories about our people and their accomplishments that inform, educate and inspire. This magazine was born out of a renewed sense of place, purpose and values that will guide the University in fulfilling its role in exploring how to resolve society’s large and complex social, environmental and economic challenges.

We believe education is one of the most powerful transformative forces on communities and individuals. It opens minds and helps people find purpose, meaning – and solutions for the world’s most pressing challenges.

This is our unified story – a story that draws on our past, understands the present, and looks to the future.

 

Articles

The future of education is already here

The main role of modern education is to support the next generation of youth in taking on our brave yet slightly broken world

Meet the UOW researchers broadening the scope of mental health research

Associate Professor Kelly Newell and Dr Katrina Green are dedicated to understanding the differences between the brains of people with and without mental illnesses.

Maximising your Engineering Studies at UOW

Some degree structure is set in stone, but there are other options you can choose to help diversify your knowledge and enable you to work more flexibly in the workplace.

Stefania’s journey to outer space

Could it also take the Three-Minute Thesis winner into space one day as well?

The rise of eco-anxiety

As the world continues to grapple with the tangible impacts of climate change, eco-anxiety has become a very real problem.

The race to save the corroboree frog

As bushfires raced through Kosciuszko National Park in January, researchers from the University of Wollongong watched in horror. Only weeks before, they had dropped more than 100 precious corroboree frogs into the area as part of their species recovery program.