Breaking the communication code

Louis Cremen and Susan Zhang

What to expect at UOW Orientation week

Enabling students to transition from previous backgrounds to university life and academic roles.

Meet the UOW researchers broadening the scope of mental health research

Understanding the biological differences between mental illnesses

Welcome to UOW's flagship magazine, The Stand.

We bring to life subjects that illustrate the impact UOW’s teaching, research and graduates make in the world.

The Stand exists to unlock the knowledge and expertise inside the University of Wollongong (UOW), telling stories about our people and their accomplishments that inform, educate and inspire. This magazine was born out of a renewed sense of place, purpose and values that will guide the University in fulfilling its role in exploring how to resolve society’s large and complex social, environmental and economic challenges.

We believe education is one of the most powerful transformative forces on communities and individuals. It opens minds and helps people find purpose, meaning – and solutions for the world’s most pressing challenges.

This is our unified story – a story that draws on our past, understands the present, and looks to the future.

 

Articles

A DIY tale

Childhood friends Adam Smith, Balunn Jones and Ben Tillman turned a small cafè into one of Australia’s most respected music brands, and signalled a new era for Wollongong in the process.

Breaking the communication code

Whatever Matrix-era stereotypes you might hold about the cyber security industry, Louis Cremen and Susan Zhang embody their opposite. Sunny and full of respect, Louis and Susan’s dual mentorship and close friendship has been integral to each-other’s success, proving itself in unexpected ways.

Re-writing the narrative

Close friends Mick Bainbridge and Jaymee Beveridge met at UOW while pursuing two extraordinarily different career pathways. But their divergent journeys shared the same goal: to rewrite a common narrative and help others do the same.

Generations of change

It's rare to get three generations worth of perspective on a relatively unchanged experience. But the three intersecting pathways that Pauline, Melissa, and Maddie Lysaght took to UOW over five decades reveals how some things on campus change—and others don’t change at all. This is their story.

Building a business from campus-up

Nik Preiner and Nathan Hancock met within their first hours on the ground at UOW. Over a decade later, the best mates and business partners haven’t had a moment to look back.

The future of education is already here

The main role of modern education is to support the next generation of youth in taking on our brave yet slightly broken world