Creating change

Mark Dombkins and Andrew Wade are creating change that matters. Here’s how.

Nature and nurture

Building a thriving business around doing good

The heart of social justice

Rising up for a better tomorrow

The heart of social justice

Rising up for a better tomorrow

Outlook Magazine is the University of Wollongong’s flagship publication for alumni featuring stories about and by our incredible graduates from around the world.

Articles

As long as women are not free, the people are not free

The coronavirus pandemic has been a shared experience of fear, displacement and frustration, but its material effects have not been felt equally. UOW alumna Van Badham writes that although everyone has faced unprecedented challenges from the (seemingly, unending) virus, women have worn the worst of the economic and social impact of COVID-19.

Addressing the ongoing gender divide

The push for gender equality that was felt around the world in the 1960s was never going to be a simple process. More than half a century later, despite much progress, the pace of change appears to be failing expectations.

Females on the political frontline

Parliaments ideally are supposed to mirror society but Australia is still struggling to boost female political representation. Outlook spoke to three UOW alumni to find out why they chose political careers and discuss their views on how to attract more women into politics.

Champion of change

UOW alumna Carol Kiernan has been instrumental in achieving equality for women in the Australian Honours by co-founding 'Honour a Woman'.

A passion for public service

Who would have thought that when Gareth Ward became the disabilities officer at the University of Wollongong, that – fast forward almost 20 years – he would be the first NSW Minister for Disability Services who actually had a disability?

Tangling with Tertangala

The Tertangala has been UOW’s student magazine – by students for students – since 1962. In the intervening decades it has been a forum for political, controversial, subversive and just plain funny commentary. We bring you five former editors, and the two current editors, of the Tert to talk about what the magazine meant to them and what the big issues have been over the years.