Creating change

Mark Dombkins and Andrew Wade are creating change that matters. Here’s how.

Nature and nurture

Building a thriving business around doing good

The heart of social justice

Rising up for a better tomorrow

The heart of social justice

Rising up for a better tomorrow

Outlook Magazine is the University of Wollongong’s flagship publication for alumni featuring stories about and by our incredible graduates from around the world.

Articles

From Arnhem Land to Antarctica

Dr Rhys Harding relishes a challenge. The UOW alumnus has spent the past eight years carving out a career as a doctor in some of the most remote locations in the world. That has meant different things at different points in his life. As a medical student, he spent a year in Broken Hill, becoming exposed to the daily rhythm of practising medicine in the outback New South Wales rural community.

On the front line

Australia’s Black Summer was like no other, with the bushfires that raged across the nation leaving many of us overwhelmed and in disbelief at the devastation they caused. During this extraordinary time, stories of the heroes doing battle on the frontline emerged.

The changing climate of the law

Matt Ward speaks convincingly about how his profession will embrace the global shift towards creating a healthy planet. He is not a bio-scientist working on a drought-resistant wheat or an architect designing eco homes that run on sunflower oil. He is a criminal lawyer.

Burning for a better future

In our rapidly changing climate, last summer's fires are unlikely to be a one-off event. The future health of people and the environment hinges on better understanding and managing the risks.

Healing the land to heal ourselves

When we think of bushfires, the issues of long-term drought and climate change spring to mind. But it seems the problem behind our fires runs much deeper and longer – and is now in short supply.

Resilience under fire

On the evening of 4 January 2020, a fast-moving front of the monstrous Currowan fire – which would ultimately destroy half a million hectares and hundreds of properties over 74 days – tore through New South Wales’ picturesque Kangaroo Valley.