ATAR-based admission

ATAR-based Admission

For most high school students, entry to UOW is determined by the result you achieve in your final years of school.

These results are usually from an Australian Tertiary Academic Rank (ATAR), an International Baccalaureate (IB) score or an equivalent interstate or offshore international qualification. All high school students applying for university must apply through the University Admission Centre (UAC) to be considered for entry. 
 

ATAR and Selection Rank (SR)

ATAR + ADJUSTMENT FACTORS = SELECTION RANK (SR)

Your ATAR is an indication of your performance across the best 10 units completed in your HSC, including the compulsory two units of English. Your performance is measured on your raw exam marks and your moderated school assessments, then scaled and ranked in relation to other students; including your entire Year 7 cohort.

The way ATARs are calculated is complex, find out more at the UAC ATAR website

ATARs are released by UAC in December each year, and although most students have already locked in their university course preferences in the UAC application system by then, you can change them if you need to.

UOW always advises you to make sure your first preference is what you are most passionate about, followed by courses that are just as interesting to you. Never put a course on your UAC preferences that you don’t want to study and never choose a course just based on your ATAR results. 

The UOW Course Finder provides details of over 200 undergraduate degrees offered across our nine Australian campuses. It includes information on the ATAR – Selection Rank (SR) and IB scores you need to gain a place in the degree, plus any other requirements for admission, such as auditions or interviews.

The score for guaranteed entry into most UOW degrees is listed as ‘ATAR – SR’ and ‘IB’ (International Baccalaureate). You may meet the score listed using your ATAR or IB alone, or your Selection Rank (your ATAR including adjustment factors).

However, due to some courses having limited places the score listed may not provide guaranteed entry. We have noted where this applies on the relevant degrees. For these degrees, the scores shown (‘ATAR – SR’ and ‘IB’) are the minimum scores required for consideration in these degrees.
 

Adjustment Factors

HSC students can have a maximum 11 adjustment points (previously called bonus points) added to their ATAR to calculate a Selection Rank (SR). Your SR can be used to receive guaranteed entry to the majority of UOW degrees. IB students are eligible to receive adjustment factors if their IB subjects match equivalent HSC subjects. UAC will convert an IB score to an ATAR before adding any adjustment factors.

UOW has three types of ATAR adjustments:

CATCHMENT ADJUSTMENTS

Students who go to school either in UOW’s catchment area or in regional NSW are eligible for three adjustment points. When you apply through UAC, these points will be automatically added if your school is eligible.

See if your school is eligible.

SUBJECT ADJUSTMENTS

If you do well in a HSC subject that is relevant to the UOW degree you’d like to study, you can earn up to three adjustment points – because we know students who do well in relevant subjects are usually well prepared for a related degree at uni. When you apply through UAC, these points will be automatically added.

Calculate your subject adjustment.

EQUITY ADJUSTMENTS

High school students who have experienced long-term educational disadvantage can receive up to five adjustment points.

You may be eligible for ATAR adjustment points for your UOW preferences through UAC’s Educational Access Scheme if:

  • you have experienced long-term (at least nine months) disadvantage in your preparation for uni (for example disrupted schooling, financial hardship, illness, disability, refugee status and socio-economic disadvantage)
  • your educational performance has been seriously affected by circumstances beyond your control, and
  • you are in Year 12, and
  • you are a permanent resident of Australia.

Find out how to apply through UAC or speak to your high school career adviser. 

Last reviewed: 29 January, 2018