A Very Short History of the Engineering Mathematics Group (EMG)

Bill Blyth and Mark Nelson

A history of the engineering mathematics group

The Engineering Mathematics Group (EMG) is a special interest group of the Australian and New Zealand Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ANZIAM) division of the Australian Mathematical Society. Although the title of the group contains the word `mathematics' the constitution of the group notes that

As uncertainty is an essential feature of the engineering environment, probability and statistics are part of the engineering mathematics' domain of interest alongside other disciplines of applied, industrial and computational mathematics.

The objective of the EMG is "to foster and promote mathematics within the field of Engineering (Constitution, 2001) " and "assist with the training of users of engineering mathematics (Constitution, 2001) " To further this end the EMG organises is mandated by the constitution to organise a biennial conference on engineering mathematics. This has become known as the Engineering Mathematics and Applications (EMAC) conference. This meeting provides a forum for researchers interested in the development and use of mathematical methods in engineering and applied mathematics. A long-running feature of EMAC is the inclusion of special sessions on engineering/mathematics education focusing on the needs of both engineering and applied mathematics undergraduates.

A history of the EMG is essentially a history of the EMAC conference series.

The constitution states that the EMG may "collect and publish information on design, development and method of delivery of courses in engineering mathematics " (Constitution, 2001). In accordance with this aim a long-running feature of EMAC is the inclusion of special sessions on engineering/mathematics education focusing on the needs of both engineering and applied mathematics undergraduates.

The constitution of the EMG was drawn up by Joseph Steiner and Alan Eastonemail. It was adopted at the inaugural meeting held at Swinburne UT in June 1992. Starting in 1994 EMAC meetings took place biennially in even numbered years. In October 2001 the constitution was amended by a Special Postal Ballot to mandate that from 2003 the EMAC conference should be held biennially in odd numbered years (Constitution 2001).

The Inaugural Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (1992)

The original idea to have an Engineering Mathematics Group was due to Professor Joseph Steiner (Joe Steiner). Professor Steiner, together with Alan Easton, founded the EMG in 1992 and started the EMAC conference seriesemail.

It is believed that the inaugural Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference was held at Swinburne in June 1992. At this meeting the constitution of the EMG was adopted.

The 1st Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (1994)

The 1st Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference was held at the Town House Hotel, Swanston Street, Melbourne. The conference, called the Australian Engineering Mathematics Conference (AEMC-94), was chaired by Professor Joseph Steineremail.

The 2nd Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (1996)

The 2nd Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference was ran at the University of Sydney. It was actually called the Australian Engineering Mathematics Conference (AEMC-96).

Whilst looking through the University of Wollongong library for something else I (MIN, 08.02.13) I was surprised to discover that the conference proceedings are available on-line.

The 3rd Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (1998)

The 3rd Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference was ran at the University of Adelaide. The conference was directed by Professor Jagannath Mazumdar. It was the first conference to use the EMAC label.

The 4th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (2000)

The 4th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference was ran at RMIT. The conference was directed by Associate Professor Bill Blyth.

An innovation introduced by Bill was to ask Professor Herszberg, an aeronautical engineer, to serve as co-chair of the EMAC committee. Professor Herszberg's presence on the committee assisted it to engage with the engineering community. (Blyth, 2005)

At the EMG meeting a request was made by the Chair of the CMG (Professor Mike Osborne) that the EMAC and CTAC swap even/odd years. This request was agreed to, but required that the constitution of the EMG be amended. This was approved by a postal vote in 2001. The EMG executive that was elected during the 2000 EMAC contained Jim Hill (Chairman of ANZIAM) and Peter May (representative of IEAust). As of November 2011 this was the last time that either of these two ex-officio position on the EMG executive were filled.

The (refereed) conference proceedings were published in a book with distribution at the conference.

The 5th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (2002)

The 5th Engineering and Mathematics Applications Conference (EMAC2005, 29th September – 2nd October) was ran at the Queensland University of Technology. The conference was directed by Dr Mike Pemberton (UQ). There were six plenary talks and 38 non-plenary talks, 10 of which were given by students. There were twenty sessions across the three days of the conference, including a CEANET seminar session for the conference silver sponsor. Papers were thirty minutes in length; twenty for the presentation, five for questions and five for changeover.

This was the first EMAC to be run by professional conference organisers, namely ICMS Pty Ltd. Due to unusually low attendance by participants (only about 65) and contracts based on higher numbers of attendees, the conference suffered a large loss. This led to the strict advice for future EMAC directors that they must not enter into contracts with costs (such as conference management costs, conference dinners etc) based on estimated numbers: costs must be based on actual numbers of participants.

The welcome reception was one of the most fancy I (MIN) can remember at any conference, though at this late date (January 2013) I am not so sure what made it so fancy...

The conference had technical tours to both QUT (Aerospace Avionics, Infomechatronics Facilities, Medical Engineering Biomechanics Robot Testing Equipment and Visualisation Laboratory) and UQ (Microgravity, Scramjet and UQ Racing). An unusual feature of the conference was a dress code (`smart casual') for both the conference and the conference dinner. It is not clear who had the task of enforcing this!

The (refereed) conference proceedings was published in a book with distribution at the conference.

Conference accommodation was organised at the Hotel George Williams, Brisbane, at a rate of $83 per night.

The 6th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (2003)

The 6th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (EMAC2003, 9–11 July 2003) was ran as an embedded meeting of the 5th International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (7–11 July 2003, Sydney). The embedded meeting ran for two hours on the Wednesday and then two full days (Thursday and Friday). The EMAC director had no influence over the ICIAM registration fees nor any direct access to ICIAM funds. However, the ICIAM conference funded an EMAC welcome function. The ICIAM conference sessions were split between the Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre and the nearby Haymarket Campus of UTS. The EMAC (and CTAC) sessions were held at UTS.

EMAC 2003 had no invited speakers. It attracted 100 registered delegates with 63 presentations, from 60 speakers, spread over 15 sessions in three parallel streams.

The diverse program reflects the interests and applications of engineering. We start with the nano scale and expand to telecommunications at the astro scale. There is a strong modelling component and many applications in manufacturing, fluids and finite elements are represented. Engineering applications include solar cells, construction and bioreactors. On Friday there is an engineering education stream. (Wood, 2003b).

Short reports on nine of the sessions (`CFD', `Data Mining', `Engineering applications - Fluids', `Engineering applications - Machines', `Engineering applications - Steel', `Engineering education', `FEM and Thin Flow', `From nano to macro', `Stability of fluids') appear in (Wood, 2003).

The sessions `From nano to macro' covered an amazing range of length scales from nanotechnology through to wavelet analysis of galaxies! The two engineering education sessions (`curriculum' and `technology') contained ten talks. Several presentations were given by people working "on engineering mathematics curriculum and investigating the state of engineering mathematics at their universities" (Wood, 2003). As a result of these presentations "It was proposed that Australian mathematicians and engineers form a working group to develop a core curriculum in mathematics for engineering, in consultation with Engineers Australia" (Wood, 2003). It was also noted that "There was also lively debate about the use of technology in engineering mathematics" (Wood, 2003)).

Finally, it was noted that "The standard of the presentations and papers was high - several of the `old hands' could do well to emulate the new researchers." (Wood, 2003) A comment that is as true today (2011) as it was then!

This was the final EMAC where the (refereed) conference proceedings were published in a book with distribution at the conference. As the editors had pdf files of all the papers for the print version they also produced a CD version of the proceedings (Bill Blyth, email 3rd April 2012).

The 7th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (2005)

EMAC 2005 followed the successful practice of EMAC 2000 by inviting an engineer to be co-chair of the EMAC committee. It was decided that the conference proceedings should follow the same format as that of CTAC 2005, namely a book of abstracts followed by publication in a special issue of a refereed journal, after the conference. Brief discussions with the editor of the ANZIAM J K (E) led to the choice of this journal. (Blyth, 2005)

Three students were awarded `best paper' and given $300 each and three students were highly commended and given $100 each.

The conference accommodation was at Janet Clarke Hall, The University of Melbourne, at $74 per single room per night and at the Ibis Hotel, Melbourne, at $104 per single room per night.

As the 2005 conference made a substantial profit, the EMG returned to a healthy financial position. Operating surplus was in the region of $15,000, reduced by the costs of converting papers in Word to LaTeX. "This is necessary since Word is the standard format for most engineers and yet we need the final form of papers to be in LaTeX for publishing in the ANZIAM J (E)". Delegates were charged $20 per paper for Word to LaTeX conversion.

The finances were handled via RMIT accounts. This had some advantages - for example: the payment of registration fees was strongly pursued! There were also some difficulties in getting the surplus released from RMIT: after urgent requests for help, an ABN and appropriate invoice from the Aust Math Soc, we were able to get approval for the transfer of the money to the Aust Math Soc. It would seem to be better for t he EMAC comm. to run their own conference accounts.

Also we recommend that the EMG have a separate a/c (and ABN) into which the EMAC 2005 monies can be transferred from the Aust Math Soc.

(Blyth, 2005)

The 8th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (2007)

The data in 2007 was discussed. The difficulty with the September AVCC "common week" is that it is not common and it's expected that it will not be observed by UTAS. If the university' facilities are not available, then organizational difficulties (associated with venue, rooms and computing) increase as does the cost. However some of the EMG Exec had some concerns that July in Hobart might deter some potential participants. (Blyth, 2005)

At the AGM There was considerable discussion over the best way to ensure that the process of publishing the proceedings does not drag on too long. It was decided that 1. Best to stay similar to CTAC for consistency, and 2. Make the submission deadline (31 July) a firm deadline and advertise the fact. The goal is to have the vast majority of the papers processed by the end of 2007. (Mercer, 2007)

EMG needs a permanent website with historical information (conferences etc), links to related conferences, previous proceedings and a link to the current conference. AustMS are in the process of totally revamping their website and it should be easier in the future to have a dedicated website. (Mercer, 2007)

A checklist for future conference organisers should be developed. The conference booklet should include: previous conferences and locations, previous student prize winners etc. (Mercer, 2007)

Look into feasibility of presenting the student prize at next ANZIAM conference. part of the prize may be payment of (some of) ANZIAM costs (eg registration). Cost could perhaps be shared with ANZIAM.

At the EMG ARM, it was decided to award the student prize winners at ANZIAM 2008. This followed from a long discussion about the logistic difficulties of determining the awardees (from about 30 student talks) in time for presentation at the conference dinner, as well as the particular difficulty of the conf dinner being a revolving restaurant.

It was resolved to fully fund (at economy rates) the awardees to attend ANZIAM 08. The travel, meals and accommodation expenses are being funded by the EMG.

FUNDING REQUEST. We ask that the registration fees for the awardees be funded by ANZIAM. The costs would be two (or possible 3) student registration fees (of $300 each).

(EMG 2007 report in Jan 2008 to ANZIAM).

Bill's comment. This was a good idea that didn't really work very well in the event. The ANZIAM Exec discussed the funding requested in detail. There was support in principle. However since the ANZIAM student support scheme for ANZIAM conf participation was not yet implemented and given that EMG could afford to pay it's prize winners, there was some concern about this request. I therefore withdrew the motion asking for ANZIAM support.

Another problem was finding a natural way to include the EMAC prize awarding. The ANZIAM conf Director was very cooperative and we did find an opportunity to award our winners before one of the keynotes.

Yet another problem was that only 2 of the 3 winners was able to attend (and the 1 Highly Commended awardee could not attend).

So, I recommend that we focus on being able to present out Student Prizes at the conference D.

Jan 2013. Bill. "We agreed to support students to attend the ANZIAM 2008 con to be presented there, but this did not work as well as we had hoped. I suspect that one Highly Commended Student Prize of $100 from EMAC 2007 remains un-presented".

We traditionally pub a conf book, distributed at the cond. We changed, from EMAC 2005, to be consistent with CTAC and pub proc post conf and in a journal. CTAC traditionally required a draft paper, with copies provided for the conf participants, although this has not been the case recently. I strongly recommend that we enforce availability of a pre-conf abs or, better, a dragy paper. As an editor of EMAC 2003 and EMAC 2005 proc, I think this would help to ensure that most of the author's work has been done before the conf rather than after! (Bill, email to EMG committee)

Should be noted that Geoff Mercer was the only editor of the conference proceedings. Heroic!

The 9th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (2009)

Before the conference

In 2007 Andrew Metcalfe agreed to look into the feasibility of hosting EMAC 2009 in Adelaide. The initial suggestion was that the conference would be run in July 2009 as the "September `common week' is less common than it should be and appears not to be a good time" (Mercer, 2007). Following discussions between Bill Blyth (Chair of EMG) and Roger Hadgraft (President of the Australian Association for Engineering Education, A2E2) it was discovered that there was "renewed interest from [A2E2] to link the annual A2E2 annual conference, held in December, with EMAC (EMG 2007)". The A2E2 conference was scheduled for 2010. However as Andrew Metcalfe was "enthusiastic about linking the two conferences" (EMG 2007) A2E2 agreed to bring forward their conference to December 2009 whilst EMG agreed to delay the EMAC conference so that the two conferences could overlap (Bill Blyth email). Consequently, EMAC 2009 was the first EMAC to be run at the beginning of December.

Despite some good will on both sides, the experiment of running the Australian Association of Engineering Education Conference alongside EMAC was unsuccessful and the idea of repeating it was not suggested for the 2011 conference. (Blyth 2011).

Following agreeing to look into the feasibility of running EMAC in Adelaide Andrew asked both Charles Pierce and Phil Howlett to act as joint conference chairs. This was agreed upon, and then forgotten as when this was announced at the ANZIAM 2008 executive meeting they both "expressed some surprised to be announced EMAC conf chairs" (Geoff Mercer). In the event, Charles was the conference chair whilst Andrew Metcalfe was the conference convenor. The job of the latter was to organise the conference, the former was a well known and respected professor whose main job was to increase the conference's academic credibility. (Charles was editor of the ANZIAM Journal and didn't have the time to deal with the day-to-day issues of organising and running a conference).

Registrations for EMAC 2007 were "alarmingly slow" (Andrew Metcalfe, 16.01.17) and at one stage there was concern about attracting sufficient numbers. However, it worked out OK in the end; with a considerable international delegation helping to boost the numbers.

During the conference

The 9th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (EMAC2009, 6th-9th December), directed by Professor Charles Pearce, was held at the University of Adelaide. The conference opened on Sunday 6th December with a joint welcome reception on campus for delegates attending either EMAC or the Australian Association of Engineering Education Conference. The formal conference program began on Monday morning.

There were 86 registered delegates (21 students): 72 from Australia, 6 from Indonesia, 2 each from New Zealand and South Africa, 1 each from Hungary, Malaysia, the UK and the USA. Of the 72 Australia delegates, 14 were from the University of Adelaide, 12 from the University of South Australia, 11 from RMIT and 10 from DSTO (Defence Science and Technology Group).

There were seven plenary speakers. There were 96 contributed presentations including an unknown number of student presents, the conference book does not distinguish between student and non-student talks. However, there were 21 registered students attending the meting. There were 30 sessions during the two and half days of the conference. The topics with the most sessions were: Environment (5), Biomedical (4.5), Operations Research (4.0) Theory (4), Education (3.5), Fluids (3.5). The next largest sessions was Signals, perhaps indicating a local DSTO interest, with two sessions.

There probably was a student prize committee, since records indicate that John Shepherd was the chair of such a committee; but no other names are known. Thiansiri Luangwilai (ADFA) was the prize winner of the best student talk, though it is unknown if he was the only winner or if there were any honourable mentions.

In 2012 Thiansiri approached the EMG chair (MIN) to report that ``they had not been sent a prize certificate nor had they been sent their prize''.

Trying to reconstruct matters at a latter date it seems that the conference director (Andrew Metcalfe) wanted to award books provided by Springer, a conference sponsor, to the student winners. Unfortunately the books provided did not necessarily have any connection to the work presented by the prize winners - a strange prize to win. The chair of the student prize committee (John Shepherd) was asked to carry the books back to RMIT and post them. John (quite reasonably) pointed out that he could not deal with the weight of the books in his airflight luggage and that Andrew could equal well post them from Adelaide.

Evidently, in the event the prizes and certificates were not posted.

The conference dinner was held in one of Adelaide's most iconic attractions: the South Australia Museum and was organised by Balaena cafe.

Avocado & Roma tomato salad w/- balsamic dressing
Atlantic salmon w/- leek & mushroom braiseor Grilled sirloin w/- herb mash & shallot glaze
Sticky date pudding w/- butterscotch sauceor Crème brulee w/- orange compote & ice-cream
Menu for the conference dinner. (Main course was a lenient alternate drop).

The EMG AGM was scheduled late on the final day of EMAC 2009. Attendance was very poor, with several apologies received. It was decided that the AGM should return to its traditional time slot at the conclusion of the technical program on the first day.

After the conference

The conference proceedings were published as a special issue (scroll down a little) within the electronic supplement of the ANZIAM journal (ANZIAM-E).

Although the EMG offered to provide seed funding of $2k or $5k (Bill Blyth. Report. Email) the organisers of EMAC2009 were able to run the conference without financial support. When the EMAC 2009 financial report was finalised, early in January 2013, it transpired that the conference had been able to make a small profit ($260.59) which was transferred to the EMG.

The 10th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (2011)

The 10th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (EMAC2011, 4–7 December) was ran at the University of Technology Sydney. The conference was directed by Dr Mary Coupland. There were six plenary talks and 83 non-plenary talks, 39 of which were given by students. The prize for the best student talk was shared between Darren Engwirda (USN) and Matthew Adams (QUT) with a highly commended awarded to Thiansiri Luangwilai (UNSW, Canberra). There were 28 sessions across the two and half days of the conference, including five on education. An innovation was to have the program as a separate document to the `abstracts book'. This allowed the published program to contain `last-minute' changes that occurred after the abstracts book had been sent for printing.

There were 86 registered delegates (including invited speakers): 67 from Australia, 6 from Indonesia, 4 from Japan, 3 from New Zealand and 1 each from France, Germany, Hungary, Kenya, South Africa and the UK.

Through the ANZIAM/CSIRO Student Support Scheme the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) contributed to the conference costs for eleven students.

Over the years a number of methods have been used to determine the best student prize. At the 10th EMAC there was a dedicated committee judging the best student presentation. At least two members of the committee attended any given student presentation. This made it easier when discussing the relative merits of excellent presentations since oftentimes several committee members were able to comment on the relative merits. Another feature of interest is that the committee met at the end of the first day to establish `front-runners' for the prize. By clarifying what made these presentations `outstanding' the committee knew what they were looking for in the presentations on the second day.

The conference dinner was a harbour cruise aboard the Captain Cook III. This will be a very difficult conference dinner experience for future conferences to top! Although delegates were arrived to arrive at King Street Wharf (Wharf Number nine) at 18:15 sharp for a 18:30 departure the last set of delegates only arrived just in time. Had they been one minute later they would have had to make a swim for it!

Entree
Crystal prawn, papaya mango salsa, petite salad, Aruga caviar, seaweed & preserved lemon
or
Fresh fig, Serrano ham, heirloom tomatoes, roast capsicum, black olive salsa, seasoned garlic sourdough.
Main Course
Grilled Atlantic salmon, lemon pepper crust, smash pea potatoes, wasabi hollandaise
or
Beef tenderloin fillet, Paris mash, caramelized red onion, bay seasonal greens, oxtail ragout sauce.
Desserts
Triple chocolate
or
Summer berry Pavlova, meringue, vanilla cream, pistachio dust, toffee
Menu for the conference dinner.

An innovation to the social program was to have an optional "restaurant evening" on the Monday. This provided an opportunity for delegates to sign-up to a `EMAC' group going to a local restaurant.

At the time that EMAC was organised UTS had a policy that conferences should be run through professional conference organisers and that room hire charges apply (Blyth 2011). Conference Online was used as the professional conference organisers. In view of his strong support for the EMG it was decided that the EMG would provide funds to enable A/P Bill Blyth to attend the conference. The conference was available to return the seeding money of $5980 and a surplus of $1680.21 - an excellent result!

The main outcome of the EMG AGM was a decision to rename the prize for the `Best Student Talk' to the `William Finlay Blyth Prize for best student presentation'. This was a highly appropriate way in which to recognise Bill's many contributions to the EMG over many years. There was also some discussion as to whether the EMG should setup a prize to recognise ``contributions to engineering mathematics''. After some discussion it was decided that there was no enthusiasm to setup a formal nomination process.

The conference proceedings were published as a special issue (scroll down a little) within the electronic supplement of the ANZIAM journal (ANZIAM-E).

The 11th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (2013)

The 11th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (EMAC2013, 1st--4th December), directed by A/P Dann Mallet, was ran in the Science and Engineering Centre at the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane. Located next to the Brisbane River and the Botanic Gardens, the QUT Gardens Point proved a relaxing conference environment. Both the welcome reception and the conference dinner were held at Room360 on the QUT campus. The floor to ceiling glass in Room360 provided stunning views of the city skyline, the Brisbane River, Kangaroo Point Cliffs and the City Botantical Gardens.

Both the program and the book of abstracts was made available on the web page prior to the start of the conference.

There were 113 registered delegates (including invited speakers): 78 from Australia, 8 from India, 6 from China, 5 from the United States, 3 each from Malaysia and New Zealand, 2 each from Indonesia and Taiwan, and 1 each from Germany, Ghana, Hungary, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and South Africa.

There were four plenary talks and two shorter, thirty minutes each, presentations sponsored by Australian Scientific & Engineering Solutions. There were an additional 81 presentations, 37 of which were given by students. There were 27 sessions across the two and half days of the conference. The more popular session themes were: Engineering Mathematics (9); Stochastic/Statistical Modelling (4.5); Computational Fluid Dynamics (4.5) and Biomedical/Mathematical Biology (3).

Through the ANZIAM/CSIRO Student Support Scheme the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) contributed to the conference costs for two students (?) to attend the conference. As at EMAC 2011, the best student prize was determined by a dedicated committee. (See here for details on how the committee works). The William Finlay Blyth Prize for the best student talk was awarded to Josef Barnes (Griffith) with highly commended being awarded to Kristen Harley (QUT), Laith Hermez (University of Auckland), and Lisa Mayo (QUT).

As EMAC runs every other year, rather than being annually such as ANZIAM, there is a greatly reduced `carry-over' in student speakers from conference-to-conference. (Only one student gave a talk at EMAC2013 who had given a talk at EMAC2011). A recommendation from the student prize committee for future EMACs was that members of the committee should identify in advance potential `front-runners'. This would allow more committee members to attend these talks, leading to a better discussion of their comparative strengths.

EMAC 11 followed EMAC 10 by offering an optional `restaurant evening' on the Monday. This provided an opportunity for delegates to sign-up to a `EMAC' group going to a local restaurant. However, there was little take up for this from the delegates.

Goodies in the conference bag included an EMAC 2013 fridge magnet, a RFID protector sleeve to prevent unauthorised scanning of your credit card and a key ring that doubled as a 1m tape measure. The conference bag itself was novel, being an envirosax.

At the time that EMAC was organised QUT had a policy that conferences should be run through their own conference organisers. After some early problems, the EMAC organisers were able to circumvent this requirement.

The only outcome of the EMG AGM was the election of the new committee.

The conference proceedings were published as a special issue (scroll down a little) within the electronic supplement of the ANZIAM journal (ANZIAM-E).

The 12th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (2015)

The 12th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (EMAC2015, 6th – 9th December), directed by Dr Bronwyn Hajek, was held at the City West Campus of the University of South Australia, in Adelaide. The conference location was in the centre of Adelaide's major arts, culture and entertainment precinct. The conference opened on Sunday 6th December with a welcome reception on campus. The formal conference program began on Monday morning, with a Welcome to Country and a welcome from UniSA's DVC: Research and Innovation, Professor Tanya Monro.

There were 77 registered delegates (including invited speakers): 70 from Australia (including eight from Defence Science and Technology Group), two each from New Zealand, Japan, and Taiwan, one each from the Oman and Saudi Arabia. A presentation by Dr Andrew Metcalfe (Adelaide University) caught the attention of Adelaide's Advertiser and was mentioned in Scott Walsh's column on Saturday 12th December. The subject of the talk? A replacement for the Duckworth-Lewis method (used in rain interrupted one-day cricket games).

There were five plenary speakers, and an additional one-hour presentation sponsored by Australian Scientific and Engineering Solutions. There were 65 contributed presentations, 29 of which were student talks. There were 22 sessions during the two and half days of the conference.

Through the ANZIAM/CSIRO Student Support Scheme, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) contributed to the conference costs for 13 students to attend the conference. As at EMAC 2011 and EMAC 2013, the best student prize was determined by a dedicated committee. The committee was chaired by Dr Yvonne Stokes. The William Finlay Blyth Prize for the best student talk was awarded to Dilan Pathirana (Griffith University) with David Harman (Griffith University) and Muhammad Ilyas (University of Newcastle) being highly commended. The winner received $500 whilst the highly commended students received $100. All three students received a certificate.

For the first time, Australian Scientific and Engineering Solutions offered a prize for the best use of maple by a student. This prize was for the use of maple in the student's research which had to be clearly indicated in the presentation. This prize was judged by Professor Bill Blyth (RMIT and ASES) and awarded to Bushra Hasan (Swinburne University). The Maple winner received the Maple Advanced Engineering Bundle - 2015, consisting of the Maple Student Edition and the Advanced Engineering Mathematics with Maple e-book with solutions, and a certificate.

As is with the case for the student prize at ANZIAM, there is no requirement for the winning students to be a member of ANZIAM.

Student prize winners, Adelaide 2015.
Figure. Bill Blyth with the winner of the William Finlay Blyth Prize, Dilan Pathirana (Griffith University) and with David Harman (Griffith University) and Muhammad Ilyas (University of Newcastle) who both received honourable mentions.

The conference program was made available on the web page prior to the start of the conference.

EMAC's 10 & 11 offered an optional `restaurant evening' on the Monday. Due to low take-up of this event at EMAC 11, a similar evening was not organised at EMAC 12. However, a student pizza night was held on the Monday evening.

The conference dinner was held in one of Adelaide's most iconic attractions: the Adelaide zoo. No zoo animals were harmed during the preparation or consumption of the conference dinner, however three animals did attend during the pre-dinner drinks — a corn snake, a barn owl and a quakka. This provided some great entertainment, especially for the international attendees.

Mark Nelson with friend, Adelaide 2015.
Figure. EMG Director Mark Nelson (University of Wollongong) with one of the dinner guests - a barn owl.

Following the formal end to the conference Australian Scientific and Engineering Solutions sponsored a two-hour maple workshop.

Finally, EMAC2015 was the first EMAC conference to have a twitter tag #emac2015 — though this tag has been shared with other conferences so named. The small letters are important #EMAC2015 is the European Meeting on Ancient Ceramics! The first person to use the #emac2015 tag was Amie Albrecht.

A variety of issues were discussed at the EMG AGM. The first item discussed was the decreased attendance at EMAC 2015. The conference director noted that abstracts had been received from a number of delegates who subsequently were unable to receive travel approval from their institutions. In connection with this it was noted that the separate abstract submission and registration dates were a problem for planning -- many abstracts were submitted and accepted, but the corresponding registrations were not received. It was also noted that the KOZWaves conference was being held at the University of Adelaide over the same three days, possibly having a small effect on attendence. Given the problems with the withdrawal of delegates the final attendance, 78, compares favourably with that of the last EMAC to be in Adelaide, 86 (EMAC 2009).

A key agenda item was the timing of future EMACs. It was noted that the AustMS meeting will be held in early December from 2016. This makes early December a busy time for conferences with MODSIM, EMAC (biennially) and AustMS running in this time. It was pointed out that ASOR currently embed their annual meeting into MODSIM every second year and there was some discussion as to whether the EMG could follow their lead. Alternatives were also suggested such as including an ASOR stream in EMAC and advertising EMAC directly to ASOR members. However attendance at EMAC for ASOR members may not be attractive if MODSIM and EMAC are timetabled in close proximity to each other. Another possibility is for EMAC to return to its September slot. It was noted that the close proximity of the AustMS annual meeting and EMAC might allow the organisers of EMAC to `piggy-back' an international speaker from AustMS whilst only covering `local' expenses. This could happen if there was a suitable speaker in applied mathematics and/or mathematics education at the AustMS meeting.

The Chair also suggested that in future the EMAC invited speakers committee should include representative from the new AustMS Special Interest Group in Mathematics Education and from the Women In Mathematics SIG. This issued was discussed.

It was the sad duty of the AGM to record the death of Professor Geoffrey Mercer on 12th April 2014, a long-standing supporter of the EMG.

The conference proceedings were published as a special issue (scroll down a little) within the electronic supplement of the ANZIAM journal (ANZIAM-E).

An article about EMAC2015 was published in the Gazette of the Australian Mathematical Society (Hajek et al 2016), the first such report to appear since EMAC2003 (Wood 2003)!

The 13th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference (2017)

Before the conference

At the 2015 AGM, the EMG resolved to invite the Women in Mathematics SIG to nominate a representative as a member of the invited speakers committee for EMAC 2017 Unfortunately, this resolution was not passed on to the Chair of the 2017 Invisted Spakers Committee and the WIMSIG nominated person (A/Prof Asha Rao, nominated in early 2016) was not invited to be on the invited speakers committee (formed in late 2016). The conference organisation notes have now been updated to suggest the inclusion of a WIMSIG representative on the EMAC invited speakers committee.

The road to heaven is paved... We resolve to do a better job for EMAC2019!

The special interest group in mathematics education were also contacted (22nd January 2016) with a request to nominate a member for the invited speakers committee. However, they showed no interest in being represented on the committee.

The Executive Committee of the EMG

Officers of the EMG executive

Year Chair Secretary Treasurer
EMAC 2000–EMAC 2002Alan Easton Gary Fitz-Gerald Ian Grundy
EMAC 2005–EMAC 2007Bill Blyth Geoff Mercer Ian Grundy
EMAC 2007–EMAC 2009Bill Blyth Geoff Mercer Michael Kirkpatrick
EMAC 2009–EMAC 2011Bill Blyth Mark Nelson John Shepherd
EMAC 2011–EMAC 2013Mark Nelson Bronwyn Hajek Danny Norrison
EMAC 2013–EMAC 2015Mark Nelson Bronwyn Hajek Danny Norrison
EMAC 2017–EMAC 2017Bronwyn Hajek Mark Nelson Danny Norrison

There are currently no details of the executive in the period 1992-2000. However, it is known that Professor Joseph Steiner was twice elected chairman of the EMG email.

Ordinary members of the EMG executive

Year Committee Members
EMAC 2000–EMAC 2002 Peter Austin Bill Blyth (RMIT, -) Jack Ding Neville Fowkes
Larry Forbes Helen MacGillivray (QUT) Mike Pemberton (UQ, +)
EMAC 2005–EMAC 2007 Damien Holloway (+) Andrew Metcalfe (UAD) Mike Pemberton (UQ) John Shepherd (RMIT)
Leigh Wood (UTS)
EMAC 2007–EMAC 2009 Steve Barry Damien Holloway (-) Andrew Metcalfe (UAD, +) Mark Nelson (UOW)
John Shepherd (RMIT)
EMAC 2009–EMAC 2011 Mary Coupland (UTS, +) Andrew Metcalfe (UAD, -)
EMAC 2011–EMAC 2013 Bill Blyth (RMIT) Mary Coupland (UTS, -) John Shepherd (RMIT) Stephen Woodcock (UTS)
EMAC 2013–EMAC 2015 Bill Blyth (RMIT) Mary Coupland (UTS, -) Tara Hamilton (UNSW) Dann Mallet (QUT) John Shepherd (RMIT)
EMAC 2015–EMAC 2017 Bill Blyth (retired) Tara Hamilton (UWS) Dann Mallet (QUT) John Shepherd (RMIT) Andrew Stacey (RMIT)

mark and Bill were supposed to co-opt three further members onto the 2009–2011 executive including one from NZ with the intention of a NZ EMAC.

  1. It is sometimes the tradition of EMAC that in year "x" the previous director of EMAC (that is the EMAC held in year "x") and the next director of EMAC (that is the EMAC held in year "x+2") are elected onto the committee. These are denoted `-' and `+' in the table.

Ex-officio members of the EMG executive

Year ANZIAM Engineers CMG
EMAC 2000–EMAC 2002 Jim Hill Peter May Mike Osborne
EMAC 2005–EMAC 2007 -- -- Ian Turner
EMAC 2007–EMAC 2009 -- -- --
EMAC 2009–EMAC 2011 -- -- Ian Turner
EMAC 2011–EMAC 2013 Tim Marchant/Phil Broadbridge -- REMOVED
EMAC 2013–EMAC 2015 Phil Broadbridge/Larry Forbes --

  1. According to the EMG constitution the Chair of the Division of Applied Mathematics, or their nominated representative, is an ex-officio member of the committee. This column is denoted (ANZIAM).
  2. According to the EMG constitution the Chair of the Institute of Engineers (Australia), or their nominated representative, is an ex-officio member of the committee. This column is denoted (Engineers).
  3. There was a long running belief that the chair of the CMG (computational mathematics group) was an ex-officio member of the executive. This was discovered not to be the case in December 2013!
  4. A -- denotes that the appropriate person was not asked to be on the committee!
  5. Tim Marchant and Phil Broadbridge were the ANZIAM chairs for the periods 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 respectively. Phil Broadbridge and Larry Forbes were the ANZIAM chairs for the periods 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 respectively.

The Engineering Mathematics and Applications (EMAC) Conference Series

The meeting in 2003 was the sixth EMAC conference. So there were three conferences prior to 2000 that I don't know about. According to the constitution the meeting should be held "mid-year".

In the presentations column the first numeral is the number of non-plenary presentations. The second numerical is the number of student presentations.
Year Location Date Delegates Plenaries Presentations Director Web page
1992 (Inaugural meeting) SUT June 1992 ??? ?? ?? ?? (?) ???
1994 (1st EMAC) SUT ??? ??? ?? ?? ?? (?) Joseph Steiner email
1996 (2nd EMAC) USN ??? ??? ?? ?? ?? (?) ???
1998 (3rd EMAC) UAD ??? ??? ?? ?? ?? (?) Jagannath Mazumdar
2000 (4th EMAC) RMIT (?) 10–13 September 2000 ?? 5 712000 (?) Bill Blyth
2002 (5th EMAC) UQ 29th September–2nd October 2002 60 6 38 (10) Mike Pemberton (UQ) http://www.icms.com.au/emac02
2003 (6th EMAC) ICIAM 2003 9–11 July 2003 100 0 63 (?) Leigh Wood
2005 (7th EMAC) RMIT 25–28 September 2005 ?? 4 102 (32) Bill Blyth
2007 (8th EMAC) UTAS 1st–4th July 2007 78 ?? ?? (?) Damien Holloway
2009 (9th EMAC) UAD 6th–9th December 2009 86 7 96 (212009) Andrew Metcalfe
2011 (10th EMAC) UTS 4–7 December 2011 85 6 83 (34) Mary Coupland http://www.emac2011.com.au
2013 (11th EMAC) QUT 1–4 December 2013 113 4 81 (37) Dann Mallet http://www.emac2013.com.au
2015 (12th EMAC) USA 6–9 December 2015 77 5 65 (29) Bronwyn Hajek https://emac2015.unisa.edu.au/
2017 (13th EMAC) University of Auckland 29 November–1st December 2017 ?? ? ?? (??) Alys Clark and Richard Clarke http://emac2017.com/

Delegates include the invited speakers.
The web-pages may no longer be operational. (However, they can be found with the wayback machine - thanks to Bronwyn Hajek for pointing this out!)
2000. Presentations based on the number of papers listed in the published proceedings (May et al, 2000).
2003. The 2003 conference was embedded into the 5th International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics (7–11 July 2003, Sydney).
2009. The conference book does not distinguish between student and non-student presentations. However, I know that there were 21 students registered. I also know their names. In theory I could very carefully check the program...

Conference Committee

YearChair Co-chair Secretary Treasurer Committee
1996 Joseph Steineremail
2000 Bill Blyth I. Herszberg G. Fitz-Gerald I. Grundy A. Easton (SUT) R. May (RMIT) J. Mazumdar (UAD) J. Steiner (SUT)
(RMIT) (RMIT) (RMIT)
2002 Mike Pemberton -- -- -- Amanda Edwards (UQ) Peter Jacobs (UQ) Troy Farrell (QUT) Anthony Maeder (QUT)
(UQ) Ross McAree (UQ) Adekunle Oloyede (QUT) Sergey Suslov (USQ) Ian Turner (QUT)
2003Leigh Wood -- ---- Bill Blyth (RMIT) Lindsay Botten (UTS) Gary Fitz-Gerald (RMIT) Rob May (RMIT)
(UTS) Geoff Smith (UTS)
2005 Bill Blyth Liuping Wang John Shepherd Ian Grundy Robin Hill (RMIT) Andrew Stacey (RMIT) Leigh Wood (UTS)
(RMIT) (RMIT) (RMIT) (RMIT)
2009 Charles Pearce Fred Bowden -- -- Andrew Metcalfe (UAD) R. Brian Webby (USA) ?????? ???.
(UAD)(DSTO) ???.
2011 Mary Coupland Mark Nelson -- -- Bill Blyth (AMSI) Anne Gardner (UTS) Tim Langtry (UTS) Julia Memar (UTS).
(UTS)(UOW) Beverley Moore (UTS).
2013 Dann Mallet -- -- -- Charisse Farr (QUT) Kristen Harley (QUT) Michael Jennings (UQ) Scott McCue (QUT),
(QUT) Tim Moroney (QUT).
2015 Bronwyn Hajek -- Amie Albrecht Eric Charrault Bill Blyth (retired) Charrise Farr (QUT) Romeo Marian (USA) Elyse Perin (UniSA)
(USA) (USA) (USA) Brandon Pincombe (DSTO) Sarthok Sircar (UAD)

2009. Believed that conference chair was also treasurer.

William Finlay Blyth Prize for best student presentation

At the EMAC 2011 AGM it was decided to rename the "Best Student talk at EMAC" the William Finlay Blyth Prize.

Year Winner(s) Institution Highly Commended Institution
2005 James Caunce ADFA Ryan Adams RMIT
Frederic CortatLinkoping University, Sweden Maya MuthuswamyUniversity of Melbourne
Rosmiwati Mohd-MokhtarRMIT Himanshu VermaTU Darmstadt, Germany
2009 Thiansiri Luangwilai UNSW, Canberra
2011 Darren Engwirda USN Thiansiri Luangwilai UNSW, Canberra
Matthew Adams QUT
2013 Josef Barnes GFU Kristen Harley QUT
Laith Hermez UAL
Lisa Mayo QUT
2015 Dilan Pathirana GFU David Harman GFU
Muhammad Ilyas UNC

We don't have very good records of what the Winner(s)/ Highly Commended(s) have received.
2009. It's believed that there were three winners and three highly commendeds.

The following table indicates what the winner(s) and the highly commendeds received for their excellent presentations.

YearWinner(s) Highly Commended
2013 Certificate and $500 Certificate and $150 each
2015 Certificate and $500 Certificate and $100 each

In 2013 the certificates were signed by the chair of EMAC 2013, the chair of EMG and Bill Blyth.
In 2015 the certificates were signed by the chair of EMAC 2015 and the Chair of the Student Prize Committee.

Best student presentation using Maple

Year Winner(s) Institution
2015 Bushra Hasan Swinburne University

The following table indicates what the winner(s) and the highly commendeds received for their excellent presentations.

YearWinner(s)
2015 Certificate and a copy of the Maple Advanced Engineering Bundle - 2015

In 2015 the the Maple Advanced Engineering Bundle - 2015, consisted of the Maple Student Edition and the Advanced Engineering Mathematics with Maple e-book with solutions. The certificate was signed by Bill Blyth.

In 2015 this prize was sponsored by Australian Scientific and Engineering Solutions (ASES).

Student Prize Committee

YearChairCommittee
2005 John Shepherd
2009 John Shepherd
2011 Mark Nelson Tara Hamilton (UNSW) Sean Hendy (Wellington) Tim Langtry (UTS) Dann Mallet (QUT)
John Shepherd (RMIT) Andrew Stacey (RMIT) Tanya Tarnopolskaya (CSIRO) Steve Woodwind (UTS)
2013 Mark Nelson Bill Blyth (RMIT) Pamela Burrage (QUT) Tara Hamilton (UNSW) Dann Mallet (QUT)
Tim Moroney (QUT) John Shepherd (RMIT) Andrew Stacey (RMIT)
2015 Yvonne Stokes (UAD) Amy Albrecht (USA) Elliot Carr (QUT) Christine Mangelsdorf (UMB) Andrew Metcalf (UAD)
Martyn Nash (UAL) Darryn Reid (DSTO) Dimetre Triadis (LTU) Annette Worthy (UOW)

Student Maple Prize Committee

YearChairCommittee
2015 Bill Blyth (RMIT & ASES)

In 2015 this prize was sponsored by Australian Scientific and Engineering Solutions (ASES).

Editors of the EMAC proceedings (and links to proceedings)

In the `old' days refereed papers were published in a printed (and refereed!) conference proceedings which was distributed at the conference. Starting in 2005, the conference proceedings have appeared in a special issue of the electronic supplement of the ANZIAM Journal. These proceedings, subject to the usual rigorous ANZIAM Journal refereeing process, appear after the conference.

Year Editors
1996D. Yuen P. Broadbridge J. Steiner ISBN 9780858256538
2000R.L. May G.F. Fitz-Gerald I.H. Grundy ISBN 085825 705X
2002 Mike Pemberton Ian Turner Peter Jacobs ISSN 1447-378X
2003 R.L. May W.F. Blyth ISBN 1 86365-533-6
2005A. Stacey B. Blyth J. Shepherd A.J. Roberts ANZIAM J (E) 47(2005)
2007G.N. Mercer ANZIAM J (E) 49(2007)
2009A. Metcalfe P. Howlett M.I. Nelson A.J. Roberts ANZIAM J (E) 51(2009)
2011M.I. Nelson A.J. Roberts M. Coupland T.J. Hamilton H.S. Sidhu ANZIAM J (E) 53(2011)
2013M.I. Nelson J. Bunder T.J. Hamilton M. Jennings ANZIAM J (E) 55(2013)
2015M.I. Nelson J. Bunder D. Mallet B. Pincombe ANZIAM J (E) 57(2015)

Invited speakers committee

` `
Year Chair Conference Chair (*) EMG Chair (*)
2011 Mark Nelson Mary Coupland Bill Blyth Bob Anderssen Anne Gardner Bronwyn Hajek Tara Hamilton
(UoW) (UTS) (RMIT) (CSIRO) (UTS) (Uni SA) (UNSW)
2013 Dann Mallet --- Mark Nelson John Bell Gordon Wyeth Ian Turner
(QUT) --- (UoW) (QUT) (QUT) (QUT)
2015 Phil Broadbridge Bronwyn Hajek Mark Nelson Tracie Barber Robert Mahony Antoinette Tordesillas
(La Trobe) (USA) (UoW) (UNSW) (ANU) (UMB)
2017 Scott McCue Alys Clark Bronwyn Hajek Phil Broadbridge Pamela Burrage Roslyn Hickson Mike Plank
(QUT) (Auckland) (USA) (Latrobe) (QUT) (IBM) (Canterbury)
--- Richard Clarke --- Antoinette Tordesillas
--- (Auckland) --- (UMB)

(*) The Conference Chair and the EMG Chair should be ex-officio members of the invited speakers committee.

Invited speakers

In the following table I have tried to indicate the nominal `area' of a plenary speaker: EDU(education), ENG (engineering), MAT (mathematics), STA (statistics).

Year Speaker Institution Area
2000
Moti KarpelTechnion - Israel Institute of Technology ENG
The Interaction of Aerodynamics, Structural Dynamics and Control in the Design of Modern Aircraft
Helen MacGillivray QUT EDU
Stabilities, Transitions, Trends and Noise in Mathematics and Statistics Engineering Education
Leslie Mustoe Loughborough University, UK EDU
Responding to SARTOR 3
Seymour V. Parter University of Wisconsin-Madison MAT
Preconditioning Legendre Spectral Collocation Methods for Elliptic Problems
Peter J. Scales UMB ENG
Making Mathematics Relevant: Why isn't Filtration Theory an Engineering Reality?
2002
Dr. Noel Barton CSIRO MAT
Finite and Discrete Elements, Multi-Physics and Granular Flows
Professor Ron Daniel Oxford University, UK ENG
Teleoperation and Control Theory. Combining Physics and Mathematics to Improve the Science of Engineering Systems.
Professor Larry ForbesUTAS MAT
Applied Mathematics and MRI Coil Design
Professor Sean McKee University of Strathclyde, UK MAT
Marker and Cell - the State of the Art
Dr. Allan Paull UQ ENG
Hyshot Flight Program
Mr. Terry Stevenson Technical Director of Boeing, Australia ENG
Systems and Complexity.
2009 (University of Adelaide)
Paul Abbott UWA EDU
Teaching engineering mathematics using computer algebra
Bill Blyth AMSI & RMIT EDU
Mathematical Tales of Technology and Collaboration
Paul Cowpertwait MSU (NZ) STA
Spatial-temporal Poisson cluster models of rainfall: Applications and further developments
Tim Gourlay CUT MAT
Hydrodynamic effects on fast monohulls or catamarans travelling through the critical speed in shallow water
Charles Pearce UAD STA
Changing History
David Scullen UAD MAT
Calculation of Linearised Ship Waves
Yuri Sergeev Newcastle University (UK) MAT
Solid particles, vortices, and their interactions in helium II: visualization of quantum turbulence
2011 (University of Technology, Sydney)
Professor Simon Beecham UniSA ENG
Understanding trends, step changes and the influence of climate indices on rainfall in South Australia
Professor Sean Hendy Victoria University of Wellington MAT
Applications of mathematics to nanotechnology and materials
Professor Peter Hunter FRS University of Auckland ENG
The VPH/Physiome Project and the role of engineering mathematics in computational physiology
Dr Birgit Loch Swinburne University of Technology EDU
Teaching mathematics with technology
Dr Tanya Tarnopolskaya CSIRO MAT
Practical insight through asymptotic and perturbation analysis
Dr Christopher Watson University of Tasmania STA
Space Geodesy: Current techniques, challenges and some unsolved problems
2013 (Queensland University of Technology)
Lori Bassman and Darryl Yong Harvey Mudd College, United States EDU
``Studio'' Mathematics for Undergraduate Engineers
David Lovell CSIROMAT
Making a difference with engineering mathematics
Robert Mahony ANUENG
Observers for Symmetric Mechanical Systems
Joe Monaghan Monash UniversityMAT
Numerical methods applied to problems involving one or more fluids containing particulate matter
2015 (University of South Australia)
Kylie Catchpole Australian National University ENG
The bright future of solar energy
Christine Mangelsdorf University of Melbourne EDU
Lessons learned in teaching engineering mathematics
Martyn Nash University of Auckland (New Zealand) ENG/MAT
Multi-scale modelling of cardiac electro-mechanics, arrhythmias and heart failure
Darryn Reid Defence Science and Technology Group MAT
The imperative of mathematical uncertainty
Ben Rubinstein University of Melbourne STAT
Data integration through the lens of statistical learning

Registration Fees

Membership 2002 2005 2009 2011 2013 2015
AMS $500 $450 $540 (?) $600 $600 $600
Non-AMS $500 $450 ???? $650 $650 $650
AMS student $250 $250 $490 (?) $360 $360 $360
Non-AMS student $250 $250 ???? $390 $390 $390
Accompanying person$110 $110 ???? N/A N/A $115
Retiree N/A N/A N/A N/A $360 $410

All registration fees are `early bird'.

Other Conference Committees

In 2000, 2002 and 2003 EMAC had a technical committee. In 2013 and 2015 EMAC had an abstract review committee.

Technical Committee 2000

The EMAC 2000 conference proceedings list a `technical committee' (May et al 2000). All papers had to be reviewed by at least one member of the technical committee. Other than this I have no idea what the committee did! The members were:

Rob May (Chair) RMIT University
A. Blicblau Swinburne University of Technology
P. Broadbridge University of Wollongong
A. Easton Swinburne University of Technology
D. Fletcher University of Sydney
L. Forbes University of Tasmania
B. Golley Australian Defence Force Academy
R. Johnston Monash University
Grant Keady University of Western Australia
A. Mack University of Technology, Sydney
J. Mazumdar University of Adelaide
R, Melnik CSIRO
S. Moorthy RMIT University
J. Naser Swinburne University of Technology
N. Phan-Thien University of Sydney
F. Rose Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratories
P. Schwarz CSIRO Minerals
J. Shepherd RMIT University
Pavel Trivailo RMIT University
S. Watkins RMIT University

Technical Committee 2002

The EMAC 2002 conference proceedings list a `technical committee' (Pemberton et al 2002). I have no idea what this committee did! The members were:

Jim Hill University of Wollongong
Bill Blyth RMIT
Neville Fowkes University of Western Australia
Jagannath Mazumdar University of Adelaide
Alan East University of Papua New Guinea

Technical Committee 2003

The EMAC 2003 conference proceedings list a `technical committee' (May & Blyth, 2003). Other than having the primary responsibility for refereeing papers I do not know what this committee did. The members were:

Bill Blyth (Co-Chair) RMIT University
Rob May (Co-Chair) RMIT University
Shaun Belward James Cook University
Murray Cameron CSIRO
Pat Cretchley University of Southern Queensland
Frank de Hoog CSIRO
Neville Fowkes University of Western Australia
Milton Fuller Central Queensland University
Jules Harnett University of Technology, Sydney
David Jenkins CSIRO
Grant Keady University of Western Australia
Tim Keighley CISRO
Kerry Landman University of Melbourne
Helen MacGillivray Queensland University of Technology
Tony Miller CSIRO
Beverley Moore University of Technology, Sydney
Mike Pemberton University of Queensland
Peter Petocz University of Technology, Sydney
Stephen Roberts Australian National University
Geoff Smith University of Technology, Sydney
Wee King Soh University of Wollongong
Pavel Trivailo RMIT University
Jiyuan Tu RMIT University
Rod Weber University of New South Wales (ADFA)
Leigh Wood University of Technology, Sydney
Daniel Yuen BHP

Abstract Review Committee (2013)

The EMAC 2013 conference had an abstract review committee. The members were
Dann Mallet QUT
Mark Nelson UoW
Scott McCue QUT
Tim Moroney QUT
Kai Helge Becker QUT
Michael Jennings UQ

Abstract Review Committee (2015)

The EMAC 2015 conference had an abstract review committee. The members were
Bronwyn Hajek USA
Amie Albrecht USA
Eric Charrault USA
Brandon Pincombe DSTO
Romeo Marian USA
Sarthok Sircar UAD

Analysis of delegates

There were 78, 86, 85, 113 and 77 delegates at EMAC's 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013 and EMAC 2015 respectively. How many delegates have attended how many conferences? Data below!

Number of EMACs attended Frequency
1 326
2 30
3 9
4 3
5 3

This analysis is based upon delegate lists provided to me by Karen Bradford (EMAC 2007, 22nd January 2016), Andrew Metcalfe (EMAC 2009, 9th August 2014), Mary Coupland (EMAC 2011), Dann Mallet (EMAC 2013) and Bronwyn Hajek (EMAC 2015).

The nine people to attend three EMAC's are: Adrian Pincombe, Andrew Metcalfe, Neil Kelson, Peter Johnston, Raymond Summit, Stephen Woodcock, Tara Hamilton, Yan Ding, Zlatko Jovanoski.

The four people to attend four EMAC's are: Andrew Stacey, D'Arcy Mullamphy, Stuart Hawkins,

The three people to attend five EMAC's are: Bill Blyth, John Shepherd, Mark Nelson.

Abbreviations

ADFA Australian Defence Force Academy
AMSI Australian Mathematical Sciences Institute
ANU Australian National University
BOU Bond University
CMG Computational Mathematics Group
CSIRO Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
CUT Curtin University of Technology
DSTO Defence Science and Technology Organisation
GFU Griffith University
IEAust Institute of Engineers Australia
LTU La Trobe University
MQU Macquarie University
MSU Massey University (New Zealand)
ICIAM International Congress in Industrial and Applied Mathematics
QUT Queensland University of Technology
RMIT Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology
SUT Swinburne University of Technology
UAD University of Adelaide
UAL University of Auckland (New Zealand)
UMB University of Melbourne
UNC University of Newcastle
UNSW University of New South Wales
UNSW at ADFA University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy
UoW University of Wollongong
UQ University of Queensland
USA University of South Australia
USN University of Sydney
USQ University of Southern Queensland
UTAS University of Tasmania
UTS University of Technology, Sydney
UWA University of Western Australia

Acknowledgements

Bill Blyth provided many details of every EMAC, particularly over the 2000–2011 period. He's a walking history of EMG and EMAC! Zlatko Jovanoski gave me his copy of the EMAC 2000 and EMAC 2002 proceedings. (I was at EMAC 2002, I have no idea what happened to my copy of the proceedings!). Ross Moor told me how to replace `20-22' by the nicer looking `20–22'.

Footnotes

  1. Email from Professor Joseph Steiner. 30th September, 2015.

Bibliography

This shows the sources that I have used to write this document.

  1. Australian Mathematical Society Gazette. Volume 27 (2000)–36 (2009).
  2. A detailed reading of the Gazette might reveal a treasure trove of information about EMG. Due to lack of time I have just looked through the index of each issue.

  3. Blyth, B. (2005). Engineering Mathematics Group Report 2005 to ANZIAM (January 2006).
  4. Blyth, B. (2011). Engineering Mathematics Group (a SIG of ANZIAM). Report to ANZIAM, January 2011.
  5. Blyth, B. (2011). EMG History. Document prepared after EMAC 2011.
  6. Cohen, G. (2007). Counting Australia In. Halstead Press.
  7. The only mention of EMAC in this book is the fact that the 6th EMAC meeting was embedded into ICIAM. There is no mentioned of the EMG group.

  8. Constitution of the Engineering Mathematics Group. 1992, revised 2001. http://www.anziam.org.au/Engineering+Mathematics+Group+Constitution .
  9. EMG Report. (2007). Tabled at the ANZIAM 2008 AGM.
  10. B. Hajek, A. Albrecht and M. Nelson. (2016). 12th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference 2015. Gazette of the Australian Mathematical Society, 43(1), 14-16.
  11. May, R.L., Fitz-Gerald, G.F,, and Grundy, I.H. (Editors). (2000). EMAC 2000 Proceedings. Proceedings of the Fourth Biennial Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference, 10–13 September 2000.
  12. May, R.L., and Blyth, B., (Editors). (2003). EMAC 2003 Proceedings. Proceedings of the Sixth Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference, 10–13 September 2000.
  13. Mercer, G. (2007). Engineering Mathematics Group AGM Minutes 2007.
  14. Pemberton, M., Turner, I., and Jacobs, P. (Editors). (2002). EMAC 2002 Proceedings. The Fifth Biennial Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference, 29 September–2 October 2002.
  15. Wood, L.. (2003). The Report on EMAC: 6th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference. The Australian Mathematical Society Gazette, 30(4), 226–227.
  16. Wood, L.. (2003b). 6th Engineering Mathematics and Applications Conference. In 5th International Congress on Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Final Proceedings, page 223. ICIAM 2003.


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