Thesis

Submission of Postgraduate Theses—Guidelines for Higher Degree Candidates

  1. Writing the Thesis
    1. What are the requirements for the award of my degree?
    2. Can I submit material which has already been published?
    3. Can I use a commercial editor to prepare my thesis?
    4. Where can I seek further advice on writing my thesis?
    5. Copyright
    6. Intellectual property
    7. Responsible practice of research
    8. Retention of data
  2. Preparing the Thesis
    1. General presentation
    2. Margins and layout
    3. Plans, diagrams, tables, and photographs
    4. Length of thesis
    5. Number of volumes
  3. Submitting the thesis for examination
    1. Enrolment status at time of submission
    2. Tuition fees for International students
    3. Notification of intention to submit
    4. Number of copies required at time of submission
    5. What forms do I need to submit?
    6. Submission of thesis and Certification of Completion Form
    7. Submitting the thesis from a distance
    8. Providing a digital copy of the abstract
    9. Providing a digital copy of the final thesis
    10. Circulation of unexamined theses
  4. The Examination Process
    1. Number of examiners required
    2. Selection of potential examiners
    3. Completing the nomination of examination form
      In consultation with their supervisors, candidates should nominate at least four (4) potential examiners on the Nomination of Examiners Form. The supervisors will select two scholars from this list to be examiners. Candidates should not to be informed about the final selection of examiners.
    4. Confidentiality and contacting examiners
    5. How long does it take to examine the thesis?
  5. Examination Outcomes
    1. Examiner's Report Proforma
    2. Examiner's Written Report
    3. The Head of Postgraduate Studies' Recommendation
    4. Role of the Thesis Examination Committee
    5. Thesis Examination Committee Resolutions
    6. Making revisions
    7. Time-frame for making revisions
    8. Appeals against a thesis outcome
  6. Submitting the final copy and graduating
    1. Number of copies of the thesis required
    2. Confidential material and Freedom of Information
    3. Format of final bound copy
    4. Bookbinders
    5. Thesis binding expenses
    6. Procedures for graduation
  7. Appendix A—Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
  8. Appendix B—Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Masters by Research (Formerly Honours Master)
  9. Appendix C—Requirements for the Award of Doctor of Creative Arts
  10. Appendix D—Requirements for the Award of Doctor of Education
  11. Appendix E—Requirements for the Award of Doctor of Public Health
  12. Appendix F—Requirements of the Award for Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology)
  13. Appendix G—Requirements for the Award of Doctor of Business Administration
  14. Appendix H - Requirements for the Award of Doctor of Psychology (Clinical Psychology)
  15. Appendix I —Title Sheet
  16. Appendix J —Thesis Certification

Contact Information:

For further information about the thesis submission and examination process please contact:

HDR Thesis & Student Progress Officer
Research Student Centre
Research & Innovation Division
Building 20 (Ground-floor)
Tel: (02) 4221 3208
Fax: (02) 4221 5697
E-mail: research_student_centre@uow.edu.au
Web: http://www.uow.edu.au/research


 


Guidelines for Higher Degree Research Candidates on the Preparation Submission of HDR Theses

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance and information to research higher degree candidates who are preparing to submit their thesis. Research higher degrees include Masters - Research (formerly known as Honours Masters), Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), Doctor of Creative Arts (DCA), Doctor of Business Administration (DBA), Doctor of Education (EdD), Doctor of Public Health (DPH) and Doctor of Psychology post 2005 (ref:1) (DPSyc). These guidelines should not be used in the preparation of a PhD by Publication (ref: 2).

These guidelines are based on the University Rules governing the preparation and submission of theses (refer to Section 10 of the University of Wollongong General Course Rules - ref:3). Candidates should also seek the advice of their supervisors on the general format of the thesis, including the preparation of references and the use of appendices. It is the supervisors’ responsibility to ensure that the scholarly and
physical presentation of the thesis meets the University’s requirements. At the time of submission of the thesis, supervisors are required to certify that any inadequacies in the presentation of the thesis were pointed out to the candidate for correction before the thesis was bound. However, supervisors are not obliged to proofread the thesis on behalf of the candidate. Nor are supervisors deemed responsible for the outcome of the examination process. This booklet deals with commonly asked questions about the
writing and production of a thesis. Candidates should also consult Faculty and academic unit handbooks and web-sites for further information.
 

References

1. For further information about Thesis Examination requirements for the HDR Doctor of Psychology (commenced prior to 2005) please refer to the school of Psychology.
2 For further information about PhD by Publication, see Section 0 of the Course Rules
in the University Calendar.
3. http://www.uow.edu.au/handbook/generalcourserules/index.html



 

 

1. Writing the thesis

The main requirement for completion of a research higher degree is the submission of a thesis. A thesis is a written piece of work which reports on the substantive research undertaken during the course of a student’s candidature. A thesis usually includes a statement of a research question, a literature review, a description of the methodology, and a report of the results. Discipline conventions vary with regard to the length and format of a research thesis. Candidates are advised to consult with their supervisors regarding the appropriate format of their thesis, especially any deviations from commonly accepted standards. The thesis will be examined by experts in the field who will have expectations about the intellectual content, format and structure of the thesis.

Candidates should not underestimate the time and care required in writing the thesis. The quality of the research undertaken can only be assessed by examiners on the basis of the information and analysis presented in the thesis. The process of writing a thesis is an iterative one involving the candidate and supervisors and usually takes longer than anticipated. Guidance regarding the research design and techniques should be sought from the candidate’s supervisors; the actual research must be undertaken by the candidate and the thesis must represent an account by the candidate of their research project.


 

1.1 What are the requirements for the award of my degree?

Candidates should familiarise themselves with the requirements for the award of the degree for which they are enrolled. (Section 10.7 of the General Course Rules) outlines the extent to which the thesis should demonstrate an original and significant contribution to knowledge, as well as any other requirements. For information on specific courses, please refer to the appendices in this volume.

Candidates should be aware that they may not submit as the main content of the thesis any work or material which has previously been submitted for a degree at this University or a similar award from another institution except in the instance where a Doctoral degree thesis has been resubmitted for examination as a Masters - Research degree.


 

1.2 Can I submit material which has already been published?

Candidates are encouraged to publish work before submission of their thesis and may incorporate that work in their thesis as long as the research was undertaken during the candidature for which the thesis is being examined. This may include elaboration or explication of the previously published work, or verbatim inclusion of sole-authored published work either in appendices or as part of the main text.
Where previously published work is included verbatim, candidates are required to ensure that the material is adequately referenced. A candidate may not use reprints of journal articles in their published form as part of the body of the thesis but these may be included in the appendices.

Research students will normally be primary authors on research publications which arise from their thesis work. Supervisors may only be included as a co-author on a research student's publication if they meet the authorship criteria listed in the Policy on Authorship . If a research student and his/her supervisors co-author a publication, the research student will normally be listed as the primary author. It should be noted, however, that this order of authorship may not apply to those academic disciplines which follow a policy of listing authors alphabetically, regardless of the extent of their input. Publications arising from the work of a research student will not usually be submitted for publication without consultation with the student's supervisors..


 

1.3 Can I use a commercial editor to prepare my thesis?

One aspect of the thesis which will be assessed is the candidate's ability to present the research in a written format. While students may seek general advice from supervisors, colleagues and others regarding the preparation of a thesis, the actual writing must be undertaken by the candidate. Candidates may not use ghost-writers. Supervisors may assist to proofread the thesis, however, the final responsibility for accuracy and literary presentation rests with the candidate. Examiners do not react favourably to carelessly prepared work, and may require the thesis to be re-submitted in order for corrections to be made. The Deans and Directors of Graduate Studies and the Council of Australia Societies of Editors have developed policy relating to editing of Research Theses. http://www.ddogs.edu.au/cgi-bin/papers.pl?cmd=d&fid=33424


 

1.4 Where can I seek further advice on writing my thesis?

It may be useful for candidates to consult thesis writing publications prior to writing their thesis. Supervisors and Faculty Librarians can provide detailed advice on relevant references. Candidates are also encouraged to read previously examined theses in the relevant field of research. Copies of past University of Wollongong theses are contained in the archives of the University Library.
The University of Wollongong Learning Development Unit (located in Building 11) frequently runs a series of workshops on writing research theses. Many academic units also organise for Learning Development to run discipline specific workshops for research candidates. A collection of thesis writing materials is also located on the Online Research Student Guide: http://www.uow.edu.au/research/rsc/student/thesis


 

1.5 Copyright

The candidate normally retains copyright over their thesis unless otherwise agreed in writing (for example as a prerequisite requirement of an external sponsor). For further information about copyright, please contact the Copyright Officer in the Library.


 

1.6 Intellectual property

The University has a proprietary interest in all intellectual property developed by students enrolled in the University and using its resources. At the same time, the University acknowledges that only a proportion of this output is suitable for commercialisation through University procedures. It thus attempts to incorporate a level of flexibility into administration of intellectual property which is compatible
with the complexity surrounding intellectual property issues. The Intellectual Property Policy sets out guidelines for determining ownership and exploitation of intellectual property. It is accepted that the originators, whether staff or students, need to be involved in the management of any intellectual property pursued through University procedures outlined in this policy. When the University asserts its proprietary interest in intellectual property developed by staff in the course of their employment, and by
students enrolled in the University and using its resources, it will offer a range of services to assist with commercialisation of that intellectual property.


 

1.7 Responsible practice of research

The Code of Practice - Research sets out the current policy and best practice relating to procedures for responsible practices in research and dealing with problems of research misconduct.
Misconduct in research includes:

  • the fabrication of data; that is, claiming results where none has been obtained;
  • the falsification of data, including changing records;
  • plagiarism, including the direct copying of textual material, the use of other people’s data and/or ideas without acknowledgment;
  • misleading ascription of authorship including the listing of authors without their permission, attributing work to anyone who has not contributed to the research, and the lack of appropriate acknowledgment of work primarily produced by a research student/trainee or associate;
  • falsely claiming inventorship;
  • other practices that seriously deviate from those commonly accepted within the research community for proposing, conducting or reporting research. For example, failure to comply with legal requirements or official University processes (eg ethics compliance).

It does not include genuine errors or differences in interpretation or judgements of data. The list above is not meant to be all inclusive. There may be other misdemeanours. For example, in human or animal experimentation departing from approved protocols accepted by a specific discipline might constitute misconduct.


 

1.8 Retention of Data

Under the Code of Practice - Research, data must be recorded in a durable and appropriately referenced form. Wherever possible, a copy of the original data should be retained in the department or research unit in which they were generated. There may be cases where retention of original data may be difficult, such as:

  • a large volume of source material; in these cases source material should be clearly referenced in any published material; or
  • data obtained from limited access databases or in a contracted project, in such cases a written indication of the location of the original data or key information regarding the limited access database from which it was extracted must be kept in the department or research unit.

The University expects all researchers, including research students, to ensure that original data are safely held for periods of at least five years.


 

2. Preparing a thesis

Candidates should discuss the style (including general format and appearance) of the thesis with their supervisors. Different disciplines often have specific requirements on such aspects as the structure and content of the thesis, as well as referencing styles. Contact your supervisors or postgraduate co-ordinator for discipline-specific information.

The following guide outlines the common elements of all theses:

ContentsComments
Title PageThe title page should set out the full-title, the award for which the thesis is submitted (eg. Doctor of Philosophy), the full name and academic qualifications of the candidate, the name of the academic unit, and the year of submission. An example of this page is provided in Appendix I.
CertificationAll copies of the thesis must include a certificate signed by the candidate stipulating that the work has not been submitted for a degree to any other university or institution. An example of the certification is included in Appendix J.
Table of ContentsThe purpose of the Table of Contents is to provide a clear and
comprehensive index to the material presented (including page
numbers). It should include chapter (or section) headings; headings and sub-headings within chapters; references or bibliography; list of figures, tables, or illustrations; appendices. Finalisation of the table of contents can only take place when the final document has been formatted.
List of Tables, Figures, IllustrationsTables, figures and illustrations should be numbered, bear an explanatory legend and be referred to within the text. The pages bearing them should also be numbered.
List of Special Names or AbbreviationsA list of any foreign language terms (and definitions) used in the thesis. A list of abbreviations and full name.
AbstractAn abstract is a summary of the thesis. It should outline what the research was about (including the research questions), the purpose or aims of the research, the methodology used, and the major conclusions reached. An abstract will usually be 1-2 pages in length. For doctoral candidates only the abstract provided will be re-produced in an official certificate and presented to the candidate at graduation. It is anticipated
that this certificate will be used to demonstrate the research effort to potential employers and others. It is therefore essential that the abstract is accurate, grammatically correct and error free. A soft copy of the abstract should also be provided to the Research Student Centre on a PC disk saved in Microsoft Word.
AcknowledgmentsCandidates should acknowledge any assistance received during their research candidature, including academic, technical, secretarial, administrative, financial, or personal (eg. family) assistance. Acknowledgments should not normally exceed one page.
Main Body of TextThe main text will usually be divided into chapters. Each chapter should have a title, and start on a separate page.
Bibliography or List of ReferencesReferencing of material used in the thesis is a formal mechanism for giving appropriate acknowledgment of the work of others. The style of referencing used varies between disciplines, but candidates should ensure that they use a single method consistently throughout the thesis.
AppendicesAppendices should contain any supplementary material that the author considers necessary to the interpretation of the text itself. Long tables, essential raw data, detailed reports or computer printouts are generally more appropriately included as an appendix. If there is more than one appendix, the appendices should be numbered or lettered in sequence.
Other Supplementary MaterialSupplementary material such as rolls of film, floppy disks, CD-ROM, which cannot be bound together with the dissertation should be placed in a storage container or sleeve at the back of the thesis. Ensure that the packaging provides adequate protection.

 

2.1 General Presentation

It is important that the thesis be presented clearly and neatly. There should be no hand-written corrections, pasting-in of text or diagrams, or other obvious amendments. Examiners will expect a high quality of English language expression, including spelling, grammar and punctuation. All typographical errors should be corrected prior to binding.


 

2.2 Margins and layout

Theses are to be prepared in accordance with the following specifications:

  • the text of the thesis (in English) must be in double-spaced or one and a half-spaced typescript;
  • the print size of the text in the main body of the thesis should not be less than 10 point;
  • International Standards Organization paper size A4 size (297mm x 210mm) white opaque paper of good quality must be used, except for illustrative material such as drawings, photographs, printouts and sleeves for audio records, on which no restriction is placed;
  • the text may be printed double-sided or single-sided;
  • the margins on each sheet must be not less than 40 mm on the left-hand side, 20 mm on the right-hand side, 30 mm at the top and 20 mm at the bottom.
    Nb: If printing double-sided, note that the left and right-hand margins should be reversed on the even numbered pages;
  • pages should be numbered sequentially.

 

2.3 Plans, Diagrams, Tables, and Photographs

Small diagrams, tables, graphs and photographs should be incorporated into the text. They should be easy to understand without reference to the text, and must therefore include an appropriate label or caption. Captions for tables are to be inserted above, whereas legends to figures should be placed below the figure.

Occasionally, some theses involve the preparation and presentation of material in large tables or plans greater than A4 size. Such material should be placed after the main body of the thesis and bound in such a manner that it is able to be opened out and read even when the rest of the thesis is closed. Care should be taken that all photographs or images are professionally fixed in place (normal adhesive tape is not
acceptable).

When binding a thesis which includes mounted photographs, graphs or plans, you should ensure that adequate packing is inserted into the spine to ensure even thickness of the volume.


 

2.4 Length of Thesis

There is no prescribed minimum length for a thesis as this will vary with the research topic and the form of presentation. Consult with your supervisors on the length of the thesis, as some disciplines may specify a maximum word length. Candidates should note, however, that if the thesis is longer than 400 pages, examiners are notified and may refuse to be involved in the examination. If your thesis includes large appendices, you may consider binding these in a separate volume.


 

2.5 Number of Volumes

Candidates are strongly advised to bind their thesis in one volume (however, binders may not be able to bind a thesis in one volume if it exceeds 300 pages). For a lengthy thesis, candidates may find it appropriate to bind the appendices as a separate volume. Examiners are notified when the thesis is longer than 400 pages, and may choose not to examine a thesis which is of any greater length. Each volume should be clearly labelled and include a separate title page.


 

3. Submitting the Thesis for Examination

Theses must first be submitted to the primary supervisor. Once approved, the thesis, and appropriate signed paperwork is submitted to the Research Student Centre, Ground Floor, Building 20.
You can submit your thesis at any time of the year. At the time of submission, the Thesis Officer will check to make sure you are enrolled, and that you have submitted all the appropriate forms. You should also supply your contact details during the examination period. Many students move interstate or overseas after they submit their thesis, and it is vital that we can contact you quickly during the examination period.


 

3.1 Enrolment status at time of submission

Candidates must be enrolled at the time of submission and cannot submit before the minimum course length specified in the course rules. The thesis should be submitted no later than your maximum submission date. If you cannot meet this deadline, and have not requested an extension to your maximum submission date in your Annual Progress Report, then a written request for an extension of this date must be submitted to the Head of Unit. This submission should include the amount of extra time you require,
the reasons for the extension, and a statement of support from your supervisor.

DEST Course Completion Time Limits for HDR Candidates

The duration for research higher degree candidatures are specified by minimum and maximum submission dates of the thesis, which are calculated from the first session of enrolment.
 

Masters by ResearchMinimum SubmissionMaximum Submission
Full-time1 year (2 sessions)2 years (4 sessions)
Part-time2 years (4 sessions)4 years (8 sessions)
Doctor of PhilosophyMinimum SubmissionMaximum Submission
Full-time2 years (4 sessions)4 years (8 sessions)
Part-time4 years (8 sessions)8 years (16 sessions)

Candidature may be extended beyond the maximum time period following a satisfactory review of progress.


 

3.2 Tuition fees for International students

International Students who wish to avoid paying tuition fees for the following session, must submit their thesis before 31 March (for fees due in Autumn Session) or 31 August (for fees due in Spring Session). Please note that the University will advise the Department of Immigration (DIMIA) once you have submitted your thesis and are no longer enrolled. International students who wish to remain in Australia during the thesis examination period, may apply to DIMIA for a Thesis Examination Visa.


 

3.3 Notification of intention to submit

A candidate is required to give the Head of Postgraduate Studies (HPS) two months written notice of intention to submit the thesis. This allows time for the appointment of examiners and minimises delays once the thesis is submitted. The ‘Head of Postgraduate Studies’ is a term used by the Research Student Centre to refer to the person responsible for examination matters in relation to higher degree research students within the Faculty. If you are unsure who your HPS is, please contact the RSC.


 

3.4 Number of copies required at time of submission

Candidates must submit for external examination 3 (three) provisionally bound (spiral or coil bound) copies of the thesis. A number of commercial stationery suppliers and photocopiers can spiral (coil) bind the thesis, including the University Bookshop, Office Works, and Xerox copy centre.
One copy of the provisionally bound thesis is kept in the Research Student Centre in case of damage or loss during mailing to external examiners. Please note that it is currently University policy that examiners may keep their copies of the thesis if they wish.


 

3.5 What forms do I need to submit?

Candidates are required to lodge the following items when submitting their theses. These forms are available from the Forms & Policies web page: http://www.uow.edu.au/research/forms/index.html#hdr 

Thesis DeclarationThe copyright declaration form is forwarded to the University Library at the time of graduation.
Submission of Thesis and Certification of CompletionThis form must be signed by the candidate, the candidate's supervisors and the Head of Postgraduate Studies.

Please note that the Nomination of Examiners form must not be submitted by the candidate as the identity of the examiners must not be disclosed to candidates at this time. If the Nomination of Examiners form is submitted by a candidate, the supervisor may be requested to select new examiners.

From the July 2006 graduation ceremonies, doctoral candidates’ research will be briefly described at the graduation ceremonies. So that a wide audience can understand the nature of the research, doctoral candidates are requested to provide a 15 word (maximum) description in plain english. Provision is made on the Nomination of Examiners form for supplying this information to RSC.


 

3.6 Submission of Thesis and Certification of Completion Form

Candidates are advised that in signing this form, the supervisors certify:

  1. that the thesis conforms to the requirements of the Rules for the preparation and submission of theses for higher degrees;
  2. that the thesis includes a certificate indicating the extent to which the work has been performed by the candidate;
  3. that the thesis is properly presented and is prima facie worthy of examination;
  4. that any instances of inadequate presentation were pointed out to the candidate for correction;
  5. that the candidate has completed an approved programme of study and research as required.
  6. For doctoral candidates only the abstract provided will be re-produced in an official certificate and presented to the candidate at graduation. It is anticipated that this certificate will be used to demonstrate the research effort to potential employers and others. It is therefore essential that the abstract is accurate, grammatically correct and error free. A soft copy of the abstract should also
    be provided to the Research Student Centre on a PC disk saved in Microsoft Word.

If your supervisors are unable to certify that the thesis conforms to the requirements outlined above, they are required to advise you of their concerns in writing. If, following discussions with your supervisors, you still wish to submit your thesis, the matter will be referred to the Head of Postgraduate Studies for advice and counselling.

If you wish to submit your thesis without the support of your supervisor or HPS, the matter will be referred to Thesis Examination Committee. You will be required to provide a written statement outlining why the thesis should be submitted without your supervisors' consent. Supervisors will also be requested to provide a written statement outlining why they do not support the submission. The thesis may or may not be sent out for examination. Examiners will not be informed that the thesis has been submitted
without the supervisors' support.


 

3.7 Submitting the thesis from a distance

If you are not resident in Wollongong at the time of submission, you may arrange for someone else to submit the thesis on your behalf. You must ensure, however, that you have signed all the relevant forms.
Alternatively, you may mail the thesis directly to the Research Student Centre by registered mail. You must have provided a copy of your thesis to your supervisor/s previously, as they have to sign off on the Submission of Thesis & Certification of Completion form.


 

3.8 Providing a digital copy of the abstract

At the time of submission, candidates are required to submit a soft-copy (on floppy disk) of their thesis abstract. The file can be saved to a PC disk, and should be formatted using Microsoft Word. The file should include:

  • title of the thesis
  • candidate’s name
  • degree for which the thesis is being submitted
  • academic unit
  • entire abstract

The Research Student Centre will use this abstract to prepare a certificate for graduation. It is essential that this abstract is grammatically correct and error free as it will be reproduced (for Doctoral Students only at this stage) in an official certificate and presented to the HDR candidate at graduation.


 

3.9 Providing a digital copy of the final thesis

A cd containing the final version of the thesis must be supplied to the RSC before graduation can take place. Thesis Declaration: Part B must also be completed by the candidate and supervisor/s and forwarded with the cd. Information about digital theses is available at: http://www.library.uow.edu.au/theses/index.html


 

3.10 Circulation of Unexamined Theses

It is not advisable to circulate any copies of the thesis during the examination process. Examiners often require minor revisions to be made before the thesis is accepted and deposited in the University Library.


 

4. The Examination Process

 

4.1 Number of Examiners required

Master—ResearchTwo examiners—one may be internal, one must be external to the University of Wollongong
Doctoral degreesTwo examiners—both external to the University of Wollongong

 

4.2 Selection of Potential Examiners

Candidates should discuss the selection of potential examiners with their supervisors in the final months before submission. In selecting potential examiners, the candidate and supervisors should consider the following guidelines:

A. Examiners, external and internal, should be, so far as possible, at arm's length from the supervisors and candidate so as to ensure the maximum degree of objectivity

When examiners are nominated, the Head of Postgraduate Studies (HPS) should specify the nature of any known relationship between the nominated examiners and the HPS, supervisors or student. It could be difficult, both for the Thesis Examination Committee and the student, if a relationship not disclosed at the time of the appointment of examiners comes to light prior to, or even subsequent to, the completion of the examination process. Without good reason, external examiners should not be recently moved or retired members of staff, or affiliates of the relevant academic unit, nor recent research collaborators with the HPS, supervisors or student.

B. Examiners should be qualified to examine

The expertise of the examiners in the field of study ought to be unchallengeable. The University does not encourage the use as examiners, people who have not themselves qualified at the level of the thesis being sent to them. There may be justifiable exceptions to this rule of thumb, but it is incumbent on the HPS to make the case whenever such an exception is proposed.

C. Examiners should be respected in their field

The University views the use of external examiners as being as much for the student's benefit as for preserving the integrity of its degrees. HPS should therefore seek to obtain examiners of acknowledged high repute.

D. Other points to take into account are:

  • it is expected that a HPS will not nominate two external examiners from the one department or institution;
  • it is expected that a HPS will not nominate two examiners from the country of origin of a candidate from overseas, without a compelling reason to do so;
  • it is expected that any examiners nominated will be aware of the quality of thesis required for the relevant degree, particularly if the degree is not commonly offered in their own country;
  • it is expected that HPS will not nominate examiners who have been involved in drafting or have seen drafts of the thesis; and
  • it is expected that the examination will remain confidential.

 

4.3 Completing the Nomination of Examination Form

In consultation with their supervisors, candidates should nominate at least four (4) potential examiners on the Nomination of Examiners Form. The supervisors will select two scholars from this list to be examiners. Candidates must not be informed about the final selection of examiners.

The supervisors will forward the Nomination of Examiners Form to the Head of Postgraduate Studies for final approval. The HPS will then forward the form to the Research Student Centre.

If the supervisors contact the potential examiners prior to submission of thesis and obtain the examiner's consent to receive the thesis, then it is sent out to the examiner immediately. If examiners have not been contacted, the Thesis Officer will write to the examiner asking if they are available to examine. One month is allowed for this procedure. If after one month no reply has been received, the HPS will be notified and asked to advise on the next appropriate action.


 

4.4 Confidentiality and contacting examiners

Examiners are advised that the task of examination must be undertaken on a confidential basis. If necessary, an examiner can be asked to sign a confidentiality agreement.

Neither the candidate nor the supervisors should contact the examiner with regard to the thesis for any reason during the examination process. The identity of the examiners may be revealed once the examination process is completed. If you are contacted by your examiners during this time, please refer the examiner to the Thesis Officer, Research Student Centre. There may be occasions when you will meet with persons listed as ‘Potential Examiners’ at professional conferences or other such events. If
this occurs, you should refrain from discussing the examination with them.


 

4.5 How long does it take to examine the thesis?

Examiners are given six weeks from the date of receipt of the thesis in which to assess and return their reports. It normally takes from three to six months from the date the thesis is sent out for examination for a recommendation regarding the award of the degree to be finalised, particularly in cases where a thesis is forwarded overseas for examination. The examination process may take longer if candidates are required to make revisions to their thesis.

Students may track the progress of their thesis at our web-site at:
http://minda.ad.uow.edu.au/fmi/iwp/cgi?-db=Thesis&-loadframes

 


 

5. Examination Outcomes

 

5.1 Examiner's Report Proforma

All examiners are provided with a Report Proforma to complete. The Proforma contains two sections – a) a report on the quality of the thesis; and b) a recommendation in relation to the examination outcome.
In each section, the examiners are asked a series of questions and are required to circle an appropriate response.

Examiner's Proforma

Section 1. Report

I report that in my opinion:

  1. the thesis provides evidence that the candidate conducted original research;
  2. the thesis demonstrates that the candidate has made a significant contribution to the knowledge of the subject concerned;
  3. the thesis reveals that the candidate has a broad understanding of the discipline within which the work was conducted;
  4. the thesis contains material suitable for publication;
  5. the candidate has presented the thesis in a manner and level appropriate to the field of research; and
  6. the literary standard of the thesis is adequate.
Section 2. Recommendation

I recommend that:

  1. the candidate be awarded the degree without further examination; or
  2. the candidate be awarded the degree subject to the minor revisions specified being completed to the satisfaction of the HPS; or
  3. the candidate be awarded the degree subject to substantial revisions specified being completed to the satisfaction of the HPS; or
  4. the candidate be awarded the degree subject to the substantial revisions specified being completed to the satisfaction of the HPS and being sighted by the examiner(s) for confirmation of the revisions to their satisfaction; or
  5. the candidate be required to resubmit the thesis in revised form for examination after a suitable period of study and/or research; in this event, are you prepared to examine the revised thesis?; or
  6. as there are exceptional circumstances, the candidate be required to attend an oral examination to determine whether a satisfactory standard of competence in the work has been attained; or
  7. (i) the candidate be awarded the degree of Masters Research without further examination;
    (ii) the candidate be permitted to submit the revised thesis for examination for a Masters Research degree; or
  8. the candidate be not awarded the degree.

 

5.2 Examiner's Written Report

In addition to completing an Examiner’s Report Proforma, examiners are expected to provide a written report on the thesis. The length of the written report may vary depending on the nature of any suggested revisions. Many examiners see their role as one of providing feedback and suggestions for improvement rather than as a marker who will pass/fail the thesis. For this reason, written reports are often several
pages in length and contain suggestions and comments. The written report provides advice to the Thesis Examination Committee on the nature and type of revisions that may be required.


 

5.3 The Head of Postgraduate Studies' Recommendations

Once both examiners’ reports have been received by the Research Student Centre (RSC), copies are sent to the Head of Postgraduate Studies who will discuss the results with the supervisors. Candidates do NOT receive copies of the examiners’ reports at this stage. A memo from the HPS is sent to the RSC with a draft resolution to go before the Thesis Examination Committee (TEC). The memo identifies the
responses required by the candidate to each point raised by the examiners.


 

5.4 Role of the Thesis Examination Committee (TEC)

The Thesis Examination Committee is responsible for determining an examination resolution based on the examiners’ reports and the report from the Head of Postgraduate Studies. The TEC meets every month, except January, to consider any reports which have been received. The Committee consists of a Chair, and one representative from each faculty. (For a list of current TEC membership please refer to: http://www.uow.edu.au/research/committees/UOW008874.html)

Once the TEC determines a resolution, the candidate, HPS and examiners are advised in writing. This is the first time the candidate will receive advice about the examination outcome. The candidate is also sent copies of the examiners’ reports, and the HPS’ comments. If revisions are required, the candidate is requested to contact their supervisors and the HPS.


 

5.5 Thesis Examination Committee resolutions

Thesis Examination Committee resolutions fall into the following categories:

  1. Straightforward matters
  2. Revisions required
  3. Third Examiner required
  4. Further study required
  5. Oral examination required
  6. Downgrade of award (for PhD only)
  7. Fail

A. Straightforward matters:

  • the candidate be awarded the degree without further examination
  • the candidate be awarded the degree subject to straightforward revisions specified being completed.

“Straightforward matters” are those that require no changes, or extremely minimal revisions. In this instance, the candidate supplies a copy of the final bound thesis to the Research Student Centre as soon as possible (see next chapter).

B. Revisions required:

  • the candidate be awarded the degree subject to the minor revisions specified being completed to the satisfaction of the HPS.
  • the candidate be awarded the degree subject to the substantial revisions specified being completed to the satisfaction of the HPS.
  • the candidate be awarded the degree subject to the substantial revisions specified being completed to the satisfaction of the HPS and being sighted by the examiner(s) for confirmation of the revisions to their satisfaction.
  • the candidate be awarded the degree subject to the substantial revisions specified being completed to the satisfaction of the HPS and being re-examined by the examiner(s).

See Section below - Making Revisions

C. Third examiner required:

  • the thesis to be sent to a third examiner for adjudication.
  • the thesis to be sent to a third examiner for re-examination.

A third examiner may be appointed if the two reports are conflicting. The third examiner may be required to adjudicate or to examine the thesis without input from the other examiners. In the case of adjudication, the examiner is supplied with a copy of the thesis and the two examiners’ reports, and is asked to determine a resolution of the conflicting reports. In the case of examination, the third examiner is provided with a copy of the thesis for examination and is not informed that the thesis has already been
examined by two other examiners.

If the thesis is to be sent to a third examiner for adjudication or examination, the spare copy of the thesis is sent out to the examiner. Once the examiner’s report is received, the matter goes back to the TEC for consideration.

D. Further study required:

  • the candidate be required to resubmit the thesis in revised form for examination after a suitable period of study and/or research.

If the TEC determines that further study and/or research is required, the candidate must re-enrol and pay any necessary fees. The HPS and supervisors will determine what program of study and/or research is required. After this period of further work, the thesis will be revised and re-submitted. New examiners may be appointed, and the process of examination begins again.

E. Oral Examination required:

  • the candidate be required to attend an oral examination to determine whether a satisfactory standard of competence in the work has been attained.

Oral examination of candidates is exceptional and will only be conducted when doubts about a thesis judged as ‘border-line’ may be resolved by such examination. An oral examination may then be used to:

  • Examine the depth of the candidate’s understanding in respect of any particular area of the thesis;
  • Clarify interpretations placed on experimental/empirical work; and/or
  • Test a candidate’s general knowledge in areas related to the specific work.

In cases where an oral examination is to be conducted, the examination will normally take place at the University of Wollongong. The examining panel will usually consist of the examiners of the thesis, however, examiners are invited to submit questions to be put to the candidate on their behalf. Please note that oral examinations are rarely undertaken at the University of Wollongong.

F. Downgrade of award (PhD only)

  • the candidate be awarded the degree of Masters Research without further examination.
  • the candidate be permitted to submit the revised thesis for examination for a Masters Research degree.

In exceptional cases, the TEC may determine that a thesis submitted for a PhD is only of sufficient quality for a Masters by Research degree. The award may be granted by the TEC, or, it may be revised and sent out to new examiners for re-examination as a Masters by Research degree.

G. Fail:

  • the candidate be not awarded the degree.

On very rare occasions, the TEC may determine that on the basis of the examiner's reports, that a fail be awarded in relation to the degree program.


 

5.6 Making revisions

If no revisions are required, the candidate submits two properly bound copies of the final thesis to Research Student Centre.

If revisions are required to the satisfaction of the HPS and/or examiner(s):

  • the candidate makes the revisions and writes a memo informing the supervisors and the HPS that the changes have been made. The candidate should identify the revisions through the use of post-it-notes or bookmarks, and should include a written statement outlining what revisions were made, and where the examiners’ suggestions were not adopted, an explanation as to why.
  • the supervisors check that the revisions have been made, and advise the HPS.
  • after consultation with the supervisors, the HPS writes a memo to the RSC indicating his/her satisfaction with the revisions.

If the revised thesis is to be sent to the examiners:

  • the HPS writes a memo to the RSC indicating his/her satisfaction with the revisions;
  • copies of the revised (provisionally bound) thesis should be supplied to the Research Student Centre so that they can be sent to the examiner(s).
  • if the examiner(s) is satisfied with the revisions, the HPS and the candidate are informed that the final bound copies should now be submitted to the RSC;
    OR
  • if the examiner is not satisfied with the revisions, the matter goes back to the TEC.

 

5.7 Time-frame for making revisions

Under the course rules, candidates have 12 months from the date of the Thesis Examination Committee Resolution to make their revisions and re-submit their thesis. The candidate and their supervisor may make a request to the Director, RSC for an extension to this period under exceptional circumstances. If the revised thesis is not received by the Research Student Centre within 12 months, the candidate will be awarded a fail.


 

5.8 Appeals against a thesis outcome

The University has established a procedure which gives students, in certain circumstances, the right of appeal against the examination and evaluation of their candidature. Appeals are permitted on procedural grounds only, and only where a fail has been awarded or where a candidate has not been permitted to re-submit their thesis for re-examination. Appeals by disgruntled students simply rejecting the assessment of the merit of their work are not permitted. Appeals on grounds of inadequacy of supervisory or other arrangements during the period of study, are normally not permitted, unless the student can show that persistent efforts to deal with these issues were not adequately addressed. The Appeals Process is outlined in the HDR Student Academic Grievance Policy.

Grounds for appeal:

The only grounds normally permitted for an appeal against a decision not to award a higher research degree or not to allow re-submission of a thesis for re-examination, are:

  • procedural irregularities in the conduct of the examination, that may have had an effect on the outcome of the examination;
  • circumstances affecting the student’s performance of which the examiners were not aware;
  • documentable evidence of prejudice or of bias on the part of one or more of the examiners;
  • failure to consult the student about the choice of examiner.
     

Procedure:

Appeals must be made by the candidate to the Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research), in writing, within one month of the decision of the Thesis Examination Committee. The Candidate must set out fully the grounds for the appeal and provide documentary evidence in support of the appeal.


 

6. Submitting the Final Copy and Graduating

 

6.1 Number of copies of thesis required

A

Following examination of the thesis and completion of required corrections, candidates are required to provide the Research Student Centre with two properly bound copies of the thesis - one for deposit in the University Library and one with the relevant Academic Unit. At this stage, the candidate is eligible to graduate (see 6.6).

B

A candidate is also required to submit a digital copy of the final version of the thesis. The digital copy of the thesis will be accessible subject to approved access restrictions requested by the author through the University of Wollongong’s web site, a national database of Australian theses and through web search engines. Thesis Declaration: Part B, completed by the candidate and principal supervisor, must accompany the digital copy of the thesis.


 

6.2 Confidential material and Freedom of Information

The University is committed to making the outcomes of research publicly available. There may be instances when a thesis contains confidential information which cannot be made freely accessible. Such confidentiality may relate to the substance of the information or the source of the information. For example, the thesis may contain material for which the author intends to apply for patent protection or there are other possible commercial benefits. In other instances, an industry partner or research participant may request that material contained in the thesis is restricted.

In most cases, confidentiality will apply to a part or parts of the thesis only. If practical, confidential material should form a separate confidential appendix. Alternatively, it may be possible to apply for the thesis to be embargoed for a period of time. Candidates intending to restrict access to the Library copy of their thesis should seek the advice of their supervisors. The period of restriction normally granted will be twelve months. Requests to restrict access for a longer term will only be approved in exceptional circumstances. All applications must explain the reasons for which embargo is requested, and include the signatures of the supervisor and Head of Postgraduate Studies.

Candidates should consider carefully the impact that a period of embargo or restriction will have on their ability to publish and/or seek employment.


 

6.3 Format of Final Bound Copy

The formally bound copies of the thesis should be presented in the following manner:

  • the thesis must be bound in boards, covered with buckram. The thesis may be bound in any colour, but check with your academic unit to see if they have a preference;
  • the lettering on the spine binding must be 10 mm in height and should be 15mm from the bottom and across - UW; 70mm from the bottom and across - the degree; underneath the degree, the year of submission of the thesis; and evenly spaced between the degree and the top, reading upwards, the name of the author, initials of given name or names first followed by family name;
  • no other lettering or decoration is permitted on the spine or elsewhere on the binding;
  • in the binding of a thesis which includes mounted photographs or graphs or contains a back pocket, packing must be inserted at the spine to ensure even thickness of the volume;
  • the thesis must be presented in a permanent and legible form as original typescript, offset printing, or copy by other approved technique;
  • the thesis may be printed on single or double-sided paper.

Quality of paper and printing

Do not bind any laser printed pages. Librarians have noted a deterioration of texts from certain laser printers over long periods of time. Only bind your photocopied pages. In addition, you should use acid free paper to ensure that the bound copies last.

Binding more than one volume

If you are binding the thesis in two or more volumes, ensure that each volume is marked as ‘Volume 1’ or ‘Volume 2’, and that each volume has a title page. If not, it is very easy for the volumes to be separated in the Library.


 

6.4 Bookbinders

Please refer to local Yellow Pages to find suitable bookbinders in your area.


 

6.5 Thesis Binding Expenses

Recipients of Australian Postgraduate Awards (APA and APAI) and University Postgraduate Awards (UPA) and some faculty scholarships receive a thesis allowance [see 'Conditions of Award'] which assists with the costs directly associated with the production of the thesis, including typing, photocopying, temporary and final binding. Candidates must cover this expenditure themselves and then present the account to the Thesis Officer in the Research Student Centre for reimbursement. Claims can only be made after submission of the thesis. The costs of buying computers or computer equipment cannot be claimed.

Candidates who do not receive a thesis allowance through a scholarship are responsible for their own thesis binding expenses.


 

6.6 Procedures for Graduation

Candidates can apply to graduate on-line once they submit their thesis. Once two final bound copies of the thesis are lodged with the RSC and a CD containing the revised thesis, accompanied by a letter from the Head of Postgraduate Studies certifying that any revisions, where required, have been satisfactorily completed, the graduation process is initiated. You can nominate to graduate at a ceremony or in absentia at a University Council meeting.

Further information about the graduation process is available at: http://www.uow.edu.au/student/graduation/
Please note that the application Closure date does not necessarily apply to Postgraduate Research students. Contact RSC for further information.


 

Appendix A—Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

The principal criterion for the award of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is whether the thesis represents an original and significant contribution to knowledge, either by the discovery of new facts and/or the exercising of independent critical ability and/or the articulation of a new or novel approach to the research question.

An original contribution to knowledge may be reflected in a number of ways. The candidate may have raised an important new problem or have addressed an existing problem in a novel way. A candidate may have investigated previously ignored material, developed new techniques for investigating issues, or have applied existing techniques to a new area of research.

Whether a candidate’s work constitutes a “significant contribution to knowledge” could be gauged by the extent to which the thesis is publishable. Normally a satisfactory Doctoral thesis might be expected to form the basis for one or more articles in recognised refereed research journals, or in some disciplines, to form the basis of a monograph. Examiners are invited to offer an opinion on whether the
thesis contains material suitable for publication.

The thesis may include for consideration any material previously published, provided the research was undertaken during the candidature for this Doctor of Philosophy.

The research thesis should demonstrate the candidate’s ability to present the research in a written format; it should be free of typographical and grammatical errors and communicate the purpose and result of the research in a concise and effective manner.

The candidate should be able to assess critically the present state of knowledge in the subject and understand the place of the research in relation to the field.


 

Appendix B—Requirements for the Award of the Degree of Masters by Research (formerly Honours Master)

Candidates will be required to demonstrate they have received adequate training in research and research methods. While the candidate is expected to contribute to knowledge in his/her field, he/she will be more closely supervised than would a doctoral candidate; the Masters degree is seen primarily as a degree providing advanced training in research design and technique.

The examiner is therefore requested to consider the thesis from the perspective of its approach to a problem and its grasp of procedure and technique. It should not be assumed that the candidate will have chosen the topic. Candidates who have completed an Honours degree at first class standard, or undertaken equivalent research work prior to their admission, are normally required to complete one
full-time year of research: candidates without these qualifications on admission are required to complete 6 months of equivalent full-time study by coursework followed by one year of research. An examiner may assume that a candidate has successfully completed the coursework prior to submission of the thesis.

The thesis may include material previously published, provided the research was undertaken during candidature for this Masters by Research degree.

The research thesis should demonstrate the candidate’s ability to present the research in a written format; it should be free of typographical and grammatical errors and communicate the purpose and result of the research in a concise and effective manner.
The candidate should be able to assess critically the present state of knowledge in the subject and understand the place of their research in relation to the field.


 

Appendix C—Requirements for the Award of Doctor of Creative Arts

The submission for the Doctor of Creative Arts comprises the creative work together with its accompanying documentation. The documentation will be primarily in written form, and may include other forms as a record of the creative work (for example, photographic, sound and video recordings).

The documentation is intended to supplement the creative work, with the primary emphasis and focus of this degree on the creative work. There should be an integral relationship between the creative work and the documentation. The documentation, in effect, aims to demonstrate that the submission meets the criteria for the awarding of the degree. It should assist the examiners to determine whether, and in what ways the submission makes an original and significant contribution to the creative discipline(s)
and/or the area(s) of inquiry within which the work is located.

Creative discipline(s) is used here to refer to the practice and conceptual base of the relevant art form(s), such as painting, music composition, prose fiction, theatre design. Note that the creative work may span more than one creative discipline, or be interdisciplinary in relation to creative disciplines, or explore new art forms for which there is no established disciplinary location. Area of inquiry is used here to refer to way in which the submission may constitute an investigation of an area of knowledge other than the creative discipline(s). Put simply, the creative work may be about something other than its own contribution to the creative discipline(s). The documentation should clarify the intention of the candidate in relation to the creative discipline(s) and the area(s) of inquiry of the submission.

The Report indicates whether, in the opinion of the examiner, the submission meets the criteria for the awarding of the degree of Doctor of Creative Arts. The principal criteria are those of original creative work and significant contribution to the creative discipline(s) and/or area(s) of inquiry. The following notes may assist the examiner in preparing the Report:

a) The candidate’s production of original creative work should be evidenced in the creative work itself, supported by the documentation. (For example, the documentation may discuss previous work in the relevant field(s) in order to demonstrate the advance or innovation to the body of work made by the creative work.)
b) The candidate’s significant contribution should be evidenced in the creative work itself and in the documentation. In general, the documentation should indicate the nature of the contribution and
indicate the grounds on which its significance may be inferred.
c) The candidate’s broad understanding of the creative discipline(s) should be evidenced in the creative work itself and may be a focus of the documentation. Where the submission addresses area(s) of inquiry beyond the creative discipline, generally the documentation will demonstrate the nature and extent of the research involved.
d) The examiner is requested to report on whether the submission contains material suitable for publication. Publication is used here in the broad sense to include exhibition, performance and recordings. Frequently the creative work which forms one component of the submission is presented for examination in a public and professional context, such as a public exhibition or performance. In addition, creative work produced in the context of the candidacy, and referred to in the documentation, is likely to have been previously published, performed or exhibited. The examiner is not constrained by actual publication in forming an opinion about the suitability of the work for publication. Suitability represents a judgement about the worthiness of the submission (in part or in its entirety) for public promulgation, in particular directed towards professional, creative and/or scholarly audiences or readerships.
e) The examiner is requested to report on whether the submission achieves appropriate standards and modes of presentation. Examiners are likely to consider the creative work in relation to appropriate standards and expectations of professional practice within the creative discipline(s) concerned. In judging the written documentation, the examiner should report on whether it meets adequate and appropriate literary standards. Where the documentation includes material in other
forms (most frequently, photographic, video, or sound recording), the examiner may report on whether the technical and aesthetic standards achieved are adequate.

 

Appendix D—Requirements for the Award of Doctor of Education

The Doctor of Education (EdD) is an advanced degree granted on successful completion of an approved program of coursework and an independent and original investigation of an educational issue relevant to the education profession. The purpose of the degree of Doctor of Education is to prepare professional leaders in Education and related fields. Candidates undertake a focused program of study, including coursework in research methodology, a specialist area of education studies, and a thesis.

The presentation of the investigation and results should be in an acceptable form for examination as a thesis. The thesis should report original work, the research may be of an applied nature, into issues of professional or policy concern. The EdD thesis comprises two-thirds of the total program, 96 cp of the 144 cp program (approximately 95,000 words).

The principal criteria for the award of the degree of Doctor of Education is whether the thesis represents an original and significant contribution to knowledge and/or professional practice, either by the discovery of new facts or understandings, and/or the exercising of independent critical ability and/or the articulation of a new or novel approach to the research question.

An original contribution to knowledge may be reflected in a number of ways. The candidate may have raised an important new problem or have addressed an existing problem in a novel way. A candidate may have investigated previously ignored material, developed new techniques for investigating issues, or have applied existing techniques to a new area of study.

Whether a candidate’s work constitutes a “significant contribution to knowledge” could be gauged by the extent to which material from the thesis is publishable. Normally a satisfactory Doctoral thesis might be expected to form the basis for one or more articles in recognised refereed professional journals, or be the basis for a monograph. Examiners are invited to offer an opinion on the publishable content of a
thesis.

The thesis may include for consideration any material previously published, provided the research forms an integral part of their thesis and was undertaken during the candidature for this Doctor of Education.

The thesis should demonstrate the candidate's ability to present the research in a written format with related technologies as appropriate; it should be free of typographical and grammatical errors and communicate the purpose and result of the research project in a concise and effective manner. It should demonstrate that key findings have been appropriately communicated to significant stakeholders. The
candidate should be able to assess critically the present state of knowledge in the subject and understand the place of their research project in relation to the field.


 

Appendix E—Requirements for the Award of Doctor of Public Health

The total workload of the Doctor of Public Health degree is the same as for other doctoral degrees. The requirements for the degree should, if the candidate progresses well, be completed in three years full-time study, or longer if the study program is not full-time. Coursework makes up one-third of this workload (48 credit points), the other two-thirds (96 credit points) consisting of the research component, submitted as a thesis. It is expected that the total amount of time allocated to the research component will be only two-thirds the normal allocation for a full Doctor of Philosophy research program (also taken to be three years full-time). The work required to construct the thesis is less than for a thesis submitted for a Doctor of Philosophy degree and (perhaps) the scope is more limited, but the quality and level of research should be similar.

The principal criterion for the award of the degree of Doctor of Public Health is whether the thesis represents an original and significant contribution to knowledge and/or professional practice, either by the discovery of new facts and/or understanding and/or the exercising of independent critical ability and/or the articulation of a new or novel approach to the research question.

An original contribution to knowledge may be reflected in a number of ways. The candidate may have raised an important new problem or have addressed an existing problem in a novel way. A candidate may have investigated previously ignored material, developed new techniques for investigating issues, or have applied existing theory and/or techniques in a new situation of significance.

Whether a candidate’s work constitutes a “significant contribution to knowledge” could be gauged by the extent to which the thesis is publishable. Normally a satisfactory Doctoral thesis might be expected to form the basis for one or more articles in a recognised refereed journal, or in some disciplines, on the basis of a monograph. Examiners are invited to offer an opinion on the publishable content of a thesis.

The thesis may include for consideration any material previously published provided the research forms an integral part of the thesis and was undertaken during the candidature for this Doctorate of Public Health.

The thesis should demonstrate the candidate’s ability to present the research in a written format; it should be free of typographical and grammatical errors and communicate the purpose and result of the research in a concise and effective manner. The candidate should be able to assess critically the present state of knowledge in the subject and understand the place of their research in relation to the field.


 

Appendix F—Requirements of the Award for Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology)

The total workload of the Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Psychology) degree is the same as for other doctoral degrees. Coursework makes up one-third of this workload, the other two-thirds consisting of the research component which is examined by submission of the thesis.

The principal criterion for the award of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is whether the thesis represents an original and significant contribution to knowledge, either by the discovery of new facts and/or the exercising of independent critical ability and/or the articulation of a new or novel approach to the research question.

An original contribution to knowledge may be reflected in a number of ways. The candidate may have raised an important new problem or have addressed an existing problem in a novel way. A candidate may have investigated previously ignored material, developed new techniques for investigating issues, or have applied existing techniques to a new area of research.

Whether a candidate’s work constitutes a “significant contribution to knowledge” could be gauged by the extent to which the thesis is publishable. Normally a satisfactory Doctoral thesis might be expected to form the basis for one or more articles in a recognised refereed journal, or in some disciplines, on the basis of a monograph. Examiners are invited to offer an opinion on the publishable
content of a thesis.

The thesis may include for consideration any material previously published provided the research was undertaken during the candidature for this Doctor of Philosophy.
The thesis should demonstrate the candidate’s ability to present the research in a written format; it should be free of typographical and grammatical errors and communicate the purpose and result of the research in a concise and effective manner.
The candidate should be able to assess critically the present state of knowledge in the subject, and understand the place of their research in relation to the field.


 

Appendix G—Requirements for the Award of Doctor of Business Administration

The Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) is an advanced degree granted on successful completion of an approved program of coursework and an independent and original investigation of a research problem within a professional environment. The purpose of the Dba is to prepare professional leaders in Business and related fields. Candidates undertake a focused program of study, including coursework in research methodology, and a thesis.
The DBA will be completed in 2 stages:

Stage 1 will require the successful completion of the following four core subjects:

- Business Research: principles and processes (12 credits)
- Methodology – Qualitative and Quantitative (12 credits)
- Literature Review and Annotated Bibliography – 10,000 words (12 credits)
- Proposal and Defence – 10,000 words (12 credits)

Progression to stage 2 requires a grading of no less than 65% in each of the Dba’s four core subjects.

Failure to reach this grade, but gaining at least 50% in each subject will allow the student to graduate with a Masters of Business (Research).

Stage 2 is the field work and research thesis element of the program. This will be deemed to be of equivalent standing to that of the PhD. It must therefore be an original work with significant contribution to the chosen field of research. Two supervisors must be nominated for each candidate. The thesis should report original work, the research may be of an applied nature, into issues of professional or policy concern. The DBA thesis comprises two-thirds of the total program, (approximately 70,000 words).

The principal criteria for the award of the degree of DBA is whether the thesis represents an original and significant contribution to knowledge and/or professional practice, either by the discovery of new facts or understandings, and/or the exercising of independent critical ability and/or the articulation of a new or novel approach to the research question.


 

Appendix H —Requirements for the Award of the Doctor of Psychology (Clinical Psychology)

The Doctor of Psychology (DPsyc) was revised in 2005 so that it complies with national guidelines for a Research higher degree.

The Doctor of Psychology will be awarded on successful completion of an approved program of coursework and practicums, and completion of a supervised research program on a topic that is consistent with the key research interests of the Academic unit and the Faculty.

The coursework component makes up one-third of the work load and the other two-thirds consists of the research component. The practicum components are integrated with the coursework to encourage the seamless transition form theory to practicum training.

Completion of this degree will equip students with the high level research skills required for a professional in psychology. Students will be involved in all aspects of an independent research program including a comprehensive review and critique of current literature, and the designing, conduction and reporting of one or more empirical studies. Together with other research components within the degree, the study will
culminate in a doctoral thesis that constitutes a significant contribution to research or scholarship.

Research and coursework will be completed in parallel and the entire degree will be completed in four years of full-time study (or pat-time equivalent).


 

Appendix I —Title Sheet

(TITLE OF THESIS)

*A thesis submitted in (partial) fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the degree

(NAME OF DEGREE)

from

UNIVERSITY OF WOLLONGONG

by

(AUTHOR'S NAME, DEGREE(S) HELD)

(NAME OF ACADEMIC UNIT)

(YEAR)

* Where the thesis is in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the award of the degree the word “partial” must be inserted immediately before the word “fulfilment”.


 

Appendix J —Thesis Certification

Sample Certification for inclusion in Thesis:

CERTIFICATION

I, Karen M. Smith, declare that this thesis, submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of Doctor of Philosophy, in the Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wollongong, is wholly my own work unless otherwise referenced or acknowledged. The document has not been submitted for qualifications at any other academic institution.

(Signature)
Karen M. Smith
2 January 2006.

Last reviewed: 11 July, 2014
Connect: UOWResearch

Join Research on FaceBookThe Conversation buttonYoutube buttonIcon - Wordpress

Latest Newsletter

Research & Innov Cover Aug-Oct2013

HDR scholarships

HDR Pic