Casual Teaching

At UOW there are many staff who work casually in various teaching roles. You may be brand new to casual academic teaching or have years of experience. The information proffered here is designed to assist you with finding what you need before your first teaching day, as well as offering ongoing assistance across the session and for as long as you are teaching at UOW.

If you have further questions please contact: cpd-support@uow.edu.au

 

 

Just starting out?
  •  Have I done all I need to so I get paid?

It’s great that you have been offered a teaching position this session. You may be tutoring, lecturing or running lab demonstrations.

Your Subject Co-ordinator will have access to the forms you need to fill in. You must make sure that you complete these forms to be fully signed up. In order to complete these forms you will need information about your bank account, your TFN and you will need to know what you are being paid to do eg. the subject name and number, the teaching type and number of hours.

You will also need a staff email account so that you can interact with your students online (via UOW email or through your subject’s Moodle site). Again your subject co-ordinator will send you in the right direction to gain these.

 For information about recording your hours go to Web Kiosk

  • What can I do to prepare for my first day?

The first day of teaching can be daunting. But you can relieve a lot of the stress by taking three steps:

1. Talk to your subject co-ordinator
In order to prepare for your first day of teaching it’s important to meet with your Subject Co-ordinator (and/or Head Tutor) to discuss their expectations for the tutorial, lecture or lab. They may prepare an outline of the content for you and the other teaching staff to undertake for the week or for each week in the session; or they may give you other instructions about their expectations for these class times. They will also provide you with resources you will need during the session. You will still need to plan how you will do this in order to run your class to time.
It is often a requirement that you attend the associated lecture/s so that you can fully understand what your students will have heard each week. If this is not a requirement you may still want to do this so that you have a better understanding of the questions your students will be asking in your classes.

2. Watch: First tutorial clip
Here is a short clip filled with tips on what to do in your first (and subsequent) tutorial. While tutorials are the most common teaching type for casual teaching staff at UOW, we know that you may be teaching in another capacity due to your skills or expertise. This short clip may still have useful tips for you too. 
 

3. Attend: Introduction to Teaching Workshop
Like to meet others who are beginning to teach at UOW or want to refresh your teaching before the session begins?
Why not sign up for the Introduction to Teaching Workshop (formerly Tips for Tutors). This three hour introduction to casual teaching at UOW offers tips for how to prepare classes, how to keep your students on target, provides time to connect with colleagues and will point you to further professional development opportunities!


The Introduction to Teaching Workshop is advertised at the beginning of each session.
 

Want help with your teaching?

Here are four places you can find help for your teaching:

  • Sign up for the Casual Academic Teacher Newsletter

The Casual Academic Teacher is a newsletter written just for you! It comes out once a month and will keep you in touch with upcoming workshops and other professional development opportunities at UOW. There are tips for teaching and you can read answers to questions others are asking about their teaching.
Instructions to sign up

  •  Attend: Introduction to Teaching Workshop

Like to meet others who are beginning to teach at UOW or want to refresh your teaching before the session begins?
Why not sign up for the Introduction to Teaching Workshop (formerly Tips for Tutors). This three hour introduction to casual teaching at UOW offers tips for how to prepare classes, how to keep your students on target, provides time to connect with colleagues and will point you to further professional development opportunities!
The Introduction to Teaching Workshop is advertised at the beginning of each session. 

  • Still want more? Springboard into Teaching Program

In 2017, at UOW, we are introducing a short program for the professional development of casual teaching staff. The Springboard into Teaching Program explores five topics central to teaching and learning in higher education delivered over one Session. The program will be run each Session. Springboard into Teaching is an asynchronous, facilitated, online program designed as an entry level suite of modules exploring aspects of teaching and learning in higher education. The program has been specifically developed for teaching staff who are casually employed, including tutors, lab demonstrators and lecturers. The program is not assessed, but participants are encouraged to use the activities undertaken in the five modules to reflect on their practice and build evidence for recognition of their teaching practice. The collected evidence and enhanced understanding of teaching and learning in higher education can then be used to develop a submission of a UOW Continuing Professional Development (Learning & Teaching) [CPD (L&T)] teaching portfolio for recognition of your teaching practice (for further information see Recognition section below).

Interested in registering for this program?

  • Got questions?

We are always happy to receive your questions about teaching or requests for resources to assist you in your teaching practice.

Simply email us and one of our Academic Developers will contact you: cpd-support@uow.edu.au

How can I gain recognition for my teaching?

The CPD (L&T) Portfolio is a way to seek formal feedback and recognition of your teaching through a peer review process with senior teaching academics at UOW. You can submit a CPD (L&T) Portfolio at any stage in your teaching career aligned with the levels of the CPD (L&T) Framework.

To learn more go to the Accreditation for Learning & Teaching (CPD Portfolio) page.

Are there UOW policies I should know about?

Following policy review the Teaching and Assessment Policy Suite was introduced in 2016 (links below). The Code of Practice - Casual Academic Teaching is currently under review.

The Teaching and Assessment Policy Suite (TAPS):

Code of Practice 
Teaching and Assessment: Code of Practice - Teaching

Policies 
Teaching and Assessment: Subject Delivery Policy
Teaching and Assessment: Assessment and Feedback Policy

How can I get help for myself and my students?

Student Support Advisors (SSAs) are faculty based and can help students with a range of issues that are affecting their studies. They have the time to work with students to help them identify issues and to put strategies and supports in place to allow them to successfully complete their studies. SSAs may also work on Faculty specific programs that assist students.

How can I get feedback from my students?

Teacher Evaluations these are valuable sources of student feedback and can help you reflect on your teaching practice. These can be conducted once per subject/per semester. They can take into account that your students may be at different campuses. The only constraint is that you need at least 6 students to be able to register.

Resources

This section offers resources to assist the further development of your learning and teaching practices.

  • Teaching and Learning
  • Teaching using Video Conference

The Teaching and Learning with Web and Video Conference Technologies Guide, developed by UOW’s Educational Design team with clear instructions around the various purposes and technologies available at UOW, links to other UOW resources and tips for teaching using these technologies.

Information on Teaching and Learning with Web and Videoconferencing Technologies

For help with videoconferencing you can call: 4221 4941
For UOW Videoconference Guidelines.

  • Teaching online

These video resources from COFA introduce many topics around teaching online.

  • New to Lab Demonstrating

As a Lab Demonstrator you play a vital role in your students’ learning. Here is a guide developed at RMIT, Introductory Guide to Lab Demonstrators.

References

Biggs, J and Tang, C (2011) Teaching for Quality Learning at University (3rd Ed). Open University Press: England.
This book gives a clear overview of ‘university teaching’ – constructive alignment, employing activity to increase student engagement, assessment… It is engagingly written, a seminal text in learning and teaching.

Brick, J (2011) Academic Culture: A student’s guide to studying at university. Macquarie University Press: Sydney.
Available from the UOW Library via BONUS.
Brick opens up the tensions for students entering higher education for the first time. It is a great read for both student and teacher alike.

Exley, K and Dennick, R (2004) Giving a Lecture: From presenting to teaching. Routledge Falmer: New York.
With ideas on how to tackle your first guest lecture to how to make your lectures more engaging for your students, this text has been designed with practical tips and clear reasoning.

Hunt, L. and Chalmers, D. (eds) (2012). University Teaching in Focus: A learning-centred approach. ACER Press, Camberwell, Australia.
This book acts as a ‘springboard for early career academics preparing to teaching’ (back cover). It opens up the gnarly questions of student engagement, increasing real-world application of course content and developing life long learners.

Palloff, RM and Pratt, K (2013) Lessons from the virtual classroom: The realities of online teaching (2nd Ed). Jossey Bass: San Francisco. Palloff and Pratt open up the difficult subject of moving face-to-face student interaction to online, providing case studies and tips for success.

Salmon, G (2013) Etivities: The key to active online learning (2nd Ed). Routledge: New York. Salmon provides a theoretical foundation and many practical examples to assist you to put activity into your online teaching. (Coming to UOW Library soon)

Note: For further readings go to the Teaching Development webpages and investigate the reference lists in the online modules.

 

Last reviewed: 14 June, 2017